2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182706
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advancing a Magnet Culture: Advanced Practice Nurses as Leaders and Mentors
Author(s):
Cavanagh, Maureen; Newell-Helfant, Patricia
Author Details:
Maureen Cavanagh, RN, MS, MAHCM, St. Peter's Hospital, Albany, New York, USA, email: mcavanagh@stpetershealthcare.org; Patricia Newell-Helfant, RNC, MS
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: In this session clinical nurse specialists will describe the strategies they used to promote staff involvement in unit based research projects and innovative programs at a community acute care facility. Key outcomes from new initiatives and redesigned staff roles will be highlighted. ABSTRACT: One of the challenges for community hospitals who achieve Magnet designation is maintaining staff nurse involvement in research activities. This session will describe the efforts of two Clinical Nurse Specialists from the Division of Women's and Children's Services in a Magnet designated community acute care facility who systematically identified and mentored staff nurse leaders in the development of innovative programs and unit based research projects. With quality improvement and incorporation of best practices as the goal, staff nurses were coached, coaxed and encouraged to identify and solve clinical problems, incorporate national practice standards, examine researchable questions and collaborate with other disciplines. Clinical Nurse Specialists provided support in program development, research design and implementation, analysis of findings, abstract writing and submission of projects to national conferences. Staff nurses have presented at least six different projects and/or studies at national conferences in the past two years. For example, research projects in care of the late preterm infant, volume of blood draws in very small premature infants and perinatal bereavement were all presented as posters at national or regional conferences. Clinical Specialists functioned as co-presenters and provided direction to staff in the areas of poster design and presentation strategies. A nursing study on induction of labor is being conducted currently with the regional perinatal center as a co-investigator. Clinical Specialist involvement was key particularly in writing a grant proposal and securing grant funds for the project. Incorporation of new ideas and best practices gleaned from networking with colleagues nationwide at national conferences has resulted in several new initiatives and one reconfigured staff nurse role. Enthusiasm has grown incrementally. Each successful project has contributed to an overall improvement in the practice environment on the four units within the Women's and Children's Division. Building on these successes, the Clinical Nurse Specialists, in collaboration with the managers and division director yearly identify new projects and opportunities as well as candidates for development from among the staff nurses. Additionally, staff nurse have become more self directed in identifying areas of interest and willingness to be involved in new projects or in spearheading practice changes.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdvancing a Magnet Culture: Advanced Practice Nurses as Leaders and Mentorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCavanagh, Maureenen_US
dc.contributor.authorNewell-Helfant, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsMaureen Cavanagh, RN, MS, MAHCM, St. Peter's Hospital, Albany, New York, USA, email: mcavanagh@stpetershealthcare.org; Patricia Newell-Helfant, RNC, MSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182706-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: In this session clinical nurse specialists will describe the strategies they used to promote staff involvement in unit based research projects and innovative programs at a community acute care facility. Key outcomes from new initiatives and redesigned staff roles will be highlighted. ABSTRACT: One of the challenges for community hospitals who achieve Magnet designation is maintaining staff nurse involvement in research activities. This session will describe the efforts of two Clinical Nurse Specialists from the Division of Women's and Children's Services in a Magnet designated community acute care facility who systematically identified and mentored staff nurse leaders in the development of innovative programs and unit based research projects. With quality improvement and incorporation of best practices as the goal, staff nurses were coached, coaxed and encouraged to identify and solve clinical problems, incorporate national practice standards, examine researchable questions and collaborate with other disciplines. Clinical Nurse Specialists provided support in program development, research design and implementation, analysis of findings, abstract writing and submission of projects to national conferences. Staff nurses have presented at least six different projects and/or studies at national conferences in the past two years. For example, research projects in care of the late preterm infant, volume of blood draws in very small premature infants and perinatal bereavement were all presented as posters at national or regional conferences. Clinical Specialists functioned as co-presenters and provided direction to staff in the areas of poster design and presentation strategies. A nursing study on induction of labor is being conducted currently with the regional perinatal center as a co-investigator. Clinical Specialist involvement was key particularly in writing a grant proposal and securing grant funds for the project. Incorporation of new ideas and best practices gleaned from networking with colleagues nationwide at national conferences has resulted in several new initiatives and one reconfigured staff nurse role. Enthusiasm has grown incrementally. Each successful project has contributed to an overall improvement in the practice environment on the four units within the Women's and Children's Division. Building on these successes, the Clinical Nurse Specialists, in collaboration with the managers and division director yearly identify new projects and opportunities as well as candidates for development from among the staff nurses. Additionally, staff nurse have become more self directed in identifying areas of interest and willingness to be involved in new projects or in spearheading practice changes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:36:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:36:27Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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