2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182707
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advanced Practice Nurse Actualizes a Successful Palliative Care Service
Author(s):
Cella, Ann; Vitsentzos, Maria
Author Details:
Ann Cella, M.Ed., RN, CNAA, St Francis Hospital, Roslyn, New York, USA, email: ann.cella@chsli.org; Maria Vitsentzos
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Despite advances in medical technology, there is a growing population of aging patients with complex health problems, therefore hospitals are turning to palliative care. This session will demonstrate how nursing leadership recognized the vast needs of aging patients and developed strategies to adopt a palliative care model. ABSTRACT: Palliative Care, an interdisciplinary specialty focuses on improving comfort and quality of life for patients and families experiencing illness. It not only addresses the physical needs but also spiritual, emotional and social aspects of life for patients and their families. Our Chief Nursing Officer's (CNO) objective was to introduce this program into our hospital and to champion it with an Advanced Nurse Practitioner and a collaborative physician. Jean Watson's theory of caring along with our hospital mission statement played a role in guiding our CNO to pursue a Palliative Care service. Realizing the potential of this program, our CNO mentored a core team that identified shifts in today's population, which allows patients to live longer while receiving long term management of complex chronic illnesses. The team was sent for training from the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) and worked within a Performance Improvement Process to establish criteria for which our service was built upon. This consultative service has also empowered nurses to autonomously identify those patients and families in greatest need of palliative services. Three years later Palliative Care is delivered from the time of diagnosis through cure or until death and through the bereavement period. The consultative service, initiated in two medical-surgical critical care units, has grown tremendously and is now available hospital wide. The referrals are made at an earlier point in the hospitalization or even upon arrival to the Emergency Department. This has had a great impact on establishing goals of care, overall patient and family satisfaction, and length of stay. Each patient has individual needs requiring a collaborative approach to customize treatment to meet the specific goals of care for each patient and family. In an effort to address those needs, our Palliative Care nurse practitioner facilitates weekly interdisciplinary meetings at which time current trends in Palliative Care are explored and each referral is discussed for progress and treatment strategies keeping in mind the individual goals of care. More than 50% of our Palliative Care population is either discharged to home or to a rehabilitation facility. This service has impacted our recognition of the needs of a dying patient and their family. Sensitive to this, nursing leadership has advocated for the addition of four inpatient hospice beds, which we anticipate will be a reality shortly. REFERENCES: Meir, D etal. Building Hospital-Based Palliative Care Programs, Center to Advance Palliative Care, 2004.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdvanced Practice Nurse Actualizes a Successful Palliative Care Serviceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCella, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorVitsentzos, Mariaen_US
dc.author.detailsAnn Cella, M.Ed., RN, CNAA, St Francis Hospital, Roslyn, New York, USA, email: ann.cella@chsli.org; Maria Vitsentzosen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182707-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Despite advances in medical technology, there is a growing population of aging patients with complex health problems, therefore hospitals are turning to palliative care. This session will demonstrate how nursing leadership recognized the vast needs of aging patients and developed strategies to adopt a palliative care model. ABSTRACT: Palliative Care, an interdisciplinary specialty focuses on improving comfort and quality of life for patients and families experiencing illness. It not only addresses the physical needs but also spiritual, emotional and social aspects of life for patients and their families. Our Chief Nursing Officer's (CNO) objective was to introduce this program into our hospital and to champion it with an Advanced Nurse Practitioner and a collaborative physician. Jean Watson's theory of caring along with our hospital mission statement played a role in guiding our CNO to pursue a Palliative Care service. Realizing the potential of this program, our CNO mentored a core team that identified shifts in today's population, which allows patients to live longer while receiving long term management of complex chronic illnesses. The team was sent for training from the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) and worked within a Performance Improvement Process to establish criteria for which our service was built upon. This consultative service has also empowered nurses to autonomously identify those patients and families in greatest need of palliative services. Three years later Palliative Care is delivered from the time of diagnosis through cure or until death and through the bereavement period. The consultative service, initiated in two medical-surgical critical care units, has grown tremendously and is now available hospital wide. The referrals are made at an earlier point in the hospitalization or even upon arrival to the Emergency Department. This has had a great impact on establishing goals of care, overall patient and family satisfaction, and length of stay. Each patient has individual needs requiring a collaborative approach to customize treatment to meet the specific goals of care for each patient and family. In an effort to address those needs, our Palliative Care nurse practitioner facilitates weekly interdisciplinary meetings at which time current trends in Palliative Care are explored and each referral is discussed for progress and treatment strategies keeping in mind the individual goals of care. More than 50% of our Palliative Care population is either discharged to home or to a rehabilitation facility. This service has impacted our recognition of the needs of a dying patient and their family. Sensitive to this, nursing leadership has advocated for the addition of four inpatient hospice beds, which we anticipate will be a reality shortly. REFERENCES: Meir, D etal. Building Hospital-Based Palliative Care Programs, Center to Advance Palliative Care, 2004.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:36:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:36:30Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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