2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182709
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coaching off a Game Plan: Clinical Excellence
Author(s):
Chambers, Deb; Waymire, Vickie
Author Details:
Deb Chambers, RNC, BSN, MBA, Saint Elizabeth Regional Medical Center, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA, email: dchambers@stez.org; Vickie Waymire, RNC MSN
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: The clinical coaching concept, borrowed from Australia and Europe, provides bedside nurses an avenue for professional excellence. Similar to executive coaching and athletic training, the bedside clinical coach offers nurses the venue for evidence-based practice change and growth. Outcomes suggest that the program pays for itself. ABSTRACT: We will outline a creative leadership partnership supporting excellence in practice. Our nurses designed a reporting structure with the belief that every nurse, as an individual, is capable of excellence. Key to this model is a bedside clinician, with coaching skills, who is assigned as a LEAD to 10-15 individuals. The (LEAD) support the individuals who, in turn, are productive members of shared governance. Coaching is in the moment and in four formal appraisals a year per individual. Coaching topics include goal completion, celebrations and practice storytelling. Reflective listening is a key competency. The role is validated because experienced RNs articulate that becoming and being professional as a career-long, iterative process of reworking professional identity. (Macintosh, 2003). Simply put, "My LEAD helps me move past significant patient care events. Empowering conditions create more productive work environments with employees who are more satisfied, committed, more likely to try out innovative approaches, and less stressed at work or to change jobs." (Lashinger, 1996) This is the goal for the LEAD. A recent success was the publication of a nurse's sacred story that had been kept close to her heart. The coach asked her to consider writing her story down in order to get it out of her head. Subsequently, small other goals were realized until submission for publication. A white paper describes the merits of a "working" clinical coach as contextual, real time, and enhancing trust. (Winstanley & White, 2006). The coaching occurs during work hours. In 2007, only 120 hours of non-direct care was utilized in coaching activities. The small span of control provides coaching success on budget. The results of year one demonstrate similar returns as cited by Kowalski, 2007. The program paid for itself in saved overtime, reduced training costs with turnover. Issue resolutions have increased six fold to councils with record completions. Patient, Staff and Physician Satisfaction scores have improved. Nurses have returned for BSN/MSN. There has been a six fold increase in met goals and active participation in certification and differentiated practice. The professional coaching model has infused staff with energy and enthusiasm. There is a perceived syergism. This empowerment model has positively affected both novice and expert nurses with minimal costs or time. REFERENCES: Andrews, M., & Wallis, M. (1999). Mentorship in nursing: a literature review. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 29(1), 201-207. Cleary, M., & Freman, A. (2005). Self-Directed Learning and Portfolio Development for Nurses: Developing workbooks as a Facilitative Tool. Contemporary Nurse, 20(1), 14-20. Driscoll, J., Cooper, R., (2005). Coaching for Clinicians. Nursing Management-UK, 12(1). Fontaine, D., & Gerardi, D. (2005) Healthier Hospitals? Nursing Management, 36(10), 34-44. Kluska, K., Laschinger, S., Heather, K., and Kerr, M.. (2004). Staff Nurse Empowerment and Effort-Reward Imbalance. Research Leadership, 17(1), 112-128. Macintosh, J. (2003). Reworking Professional Nursing Identity. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 25 (6), 725-741. O'Shea, E. (2003). Self-Directed Learning in Nursing Education: a review of the literature. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 43(1), 62-70. Wagner, S., (2006). From Satisfied to Engaged. Nursing Management, 37(3), 25-29. White, E., & Winstanley, J. (2006). Clinical Supervision: Models, Measures and Best Practice. Nurse Researcher, 10(4), 1-38. Williamson, T. (2005). Work-based Learning: A Leadership development example from an action research study of shared governance implementation. Journal of Nursing Management, 36(13), 490-499. Adopting a Clinical Coach Role Nebraska State of the Art, Omaha NE 2007 (Podium) Reaffirm Shared Governance in a Perinatal Center: Restructuring Leadership by Adopting a Clinical Coach Role AWHONN National Convention 2007 (Podium) Synthesizing Evidence into a Clinical role within Shared Governance Summer Institute on Evidence-Based Practice: Quality and Safety San Antonio 2007 (Poster) The Role of LEAD as Coach CEU offering SERMC Lincoln, NE 2007 (Podium) Reaffirm Shared Governance by Adopting a Clinical Coach Role Nebraska Organization of Nurse Executives District One Meeting Omaha, NE 2008 (Podium) Coaches make for Better Nursing 9TH Annual National/International Evidence-Based Conference 2008 Arizona State University Evidence Based Practice Tempe, Arizona 2008 (Poster).
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoaching off a Game Plan: Clinical Excellenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChambers, Deben_US
dc.contributor.authorWaymire, Vickieen_US
dc.author.detailsDeb Chambers, RNC, BSN, MBA, Saint Elizabeth Regional Medical Center, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA, email: dchambers@stez.org; Vickie Waymire, RNC MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182709-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: The clinical coaching concept, borrowed from Australia and Europe, provides bedside nurses an avenue for professional excellence. Similar to executive coaching and athletic training, the bedside clinical coach offers nurses the venue for evidence-based practice change and growth. Outcomes suggest that the program pays for itself. ABSTRACT: We will outline a creative leadership partnership supporting excellence in practice. Our nurses designed a reporting structure with the belief that every nurse, as an individual, is capable of excellence. Key to this model is a bedside clinician, with coaching skills, who is assigned as a LEAD to 10-15 individuals. The (LEAD) support the individuals who, in turn, are productive members of shared governance. Coaching is in the moment and in four formal appraisals a year per individual. Coaching topics include goal completion, celebrations and practice storytelling. Reflective listening is a key competency. The role is validated because experienced RNs articulate that becoming and being professional as a career-long, iterative process of reworking professional identity. (Macintosh, 2003). Simply put, "My LEAD helps me move past significant patient care events. Empowering conditions create more productive work environments with employees who are more satisfied, committed, more likely to try out innovative approaches, and less stressed at work or to change jobs." (Lashinger, 1996) This is the goal for the LEAD. A recent success was the publication of a nurse's sacred story that had been kept close to her heart. The coach asked her to consider writing her story down in order to get it out of her head. Subsequently, small other goals were realized until submission for publication. A white paper describes the merits of a "working" clinical coach as contextual, real time, and enhancing trust. (Winstanley & White, 2006). The coaching occurs during work hours. In 2007, only 120 hours of non-direct care was utilized in coaching activities. The small span of control provides coaching success on budget. The results of year one demonstrate similar returns as cited by Kowalski, 2007. The program paid for itself in saved overtime, reduced training costs with turnover. Issue resolutions have increased six fold to councils with record completions. Patient, Staff and Physician Satisfaction scores have improved. Nurses have returned for BSN/MSN. There has been a six fold increase in met goals and active participation in certification and differentiated practice. The professional coaching model has infused staff with energy and enthusiasm. There is a perceived syergism. This empowerment model has positively affected both novice and expert nurses with minimal costs or time. REFERENCES: Andrews, M., & Wallis, M. (1999). Mentorship in nursing: a literature review. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 29(1), 201-207. Cleary, M., & Freman, A. (2005). Self-Directed Learning and Portfolio Development for Nurses: Developing workbooks as a Facilitative Tool. Contemporary Nurse, 20(1), 14-20. Driscoll, J., Cooper, R., (2005). Coaching for Clinicians. Nursing Management-UK, 12(1). Fontaine, D., & Gerardi, D. (2005) Healthier Hospitals? Nursing Management, 36(10), 34-44. Kluska, K., Laschinger, S., Heather, K., and Kerr, M.. (2004). Staff Nurse Empowerment and Effort-Reward Imbalance. Research Leadership, 17(1), 112-128. Macintosh, J. (2003). Reworking Professional Nursing Identity. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 25 (6), 725-741. O'Shea, E. (2003). Self-Directed Learning in Nursing Education: a review of the literature. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 43(1), 62-70. Wagner, S., (2006). From Satisfied to Engaged. Nursing Management, 37(3), 25-29. White, E., & Winstanley, J. (2006). Clinical Supervision: Models, Measures and Best Practice. Nurse Researcher, 10(4), 1-38. Williamson, T. (2005). Work-based Learning: A Leadership development example from an action research study of shared governance implementation. Journal of Nursing Management, 36(13), 490-499. Adopting a Clinical Coach Role Nebraska State of the Art, Omaha NE 2007 (Podium) Reaffirm Shared Governance in a Perinatal Center: Restructuring Leadership by Adopting a Clinical Coach Role AWHONN National Convention 2007 (Podium) Synthesizing Evidence into a Clinical role within Shared Governance Summer Institute on Evidence-Based Practice: Quality and Safety San Antonio 2007 (Poster) The Role of LEAD as Coach CEU offering SERMC Lincoln, NE 2007 (Podium) Reaffirm Shared Governance by Adopting a Clinical Coach Role Nebraska Organization of Nurse Executives District One Meeting Omaha, NE 2008 (Podium) Coaches make for Better Nursing 9TH Annual National/International Evidence-Based Conference 2008 Arizona State University Evidence Based Practice Tempe, Arizona 2008 (Poster).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:36:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:36:35Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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