2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182711
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Practice Congress
Author(s):
Cline, Debbie; Johnston, Patricia
Author Details:
Debbie Cline, BSN, RN, OCN, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: dbcline@mdanderson.org; Patricia Johnston, MSHA, BSN, RN, OCN
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Learn how Implementation of a redesigned shared governance model, the Nursing Practice Congress, has increased participation in shaping clinical practice at a large comprehensive cancer center. Technology has been essential to the success of the NPC allowing better communication and transparency of NPC functions across the organization. ABSTRACT: Transitioning from a long standing councilor model to a shared governance congressional model, The Nursing Practice Congress (NPC) has increased participation by clinical nurses in shaping clinical practice at a large comprehensive cancer center. Over 90 clinical nursing issues have been presented to the 36 peer-elected delegates over a two year period. NPC representatives are responsible for educating and assisting other nurses who wish to submit issues to the NPC and gathering nurses' input on current issues. If necessary, Professional Action Coordinating Teams (PACTs) are formed to recommend and develop solutions for nursing practice issues. Technology has been essential to the success of the NPC allowing better communication and transparency of NPC functions and clinical decisions across the organization. Use of a web-based electronic ballot allows nursing staff to view candidate pictures, biographies, goals and to vote. Another technological advance was the construction of a NPC electronic database by Information Systems permitting submission of clinical practice issues by any employee, and to track the work of the PACTs and their outcomes. Information regarding the NPC and PACTs is also disseminated via e-mail; meeting minutes are posted on a dedicated NPC web-site located on the intranet as well as thorough the Division of Nursing's weekly electronic and quarterly newsletters. Mobile in-services and a ôliveö televised meeting with a continuous loop shown on the institutional television have also been used. An electronic discussion board is available to promote off-shift and off-site participation in PACTs. Since March of 2007, PACT participation from the clinical nurses has doubled. Fiscal year 2007 concluded with a 50% resolution rate including six new policies, five revised policies, two practice outcome projects, and submission of issues to existing institutional work groups. On average, four new issues are submitted each month and the growth continues. The implementation and success of a redesigned shared governance system takes time. Using technology to assist in communicating with and involving nurses has increased their ability to feel involved and empowered. Use of PACTs and technology have resulted in achieving resolution to practice challenges in a more efficient manner therefore, directly contributing to building a culture committed to improving clinical care for the patients and families.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Practice Congressen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCline, Debbieen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsDebbie Cline, BSN, RN, OCN, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: dbcline@mdanderson.org; Patricia Johnston, MSHA, BSN, RN, OCNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182711-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Learn how Implementation of a redesigned shared governance model, the Nursing Practice Congress, has increased participation in shaping clinical practice at a large comprehensive cancer center. Technology has been essential to the success of the NPC allowing better communication and transparency of NPC functions across the organization. ABSTRACT: Transitioning from a long standing councilor model to a shared governance congressional model, The Nursing Practice Congress (NPC) has increased participation by clinical nurses in shaping clinical practice at a large comprehensive cancer center. Over 90 clinical nursing issues have been presented to the 36 peer-elected delegates over a two year period. NPC representatives are responsible for educating and assisting other nurses who wish to submit issues to the NPC and gathering nurses' input on current issues. If necessary, Professional Action Coordinating Teams (PACTs) are formed to recommend and develop solutions for nursing practice issues. Technology has been essential to the success of the NPC allowing better communication and transparency of NPC functions and clinical decisions across the organization. Use of a web-based electronic ballot allows nursing staff to view candidate pictures, biographies, goals and to vote. Another technological advance was the construction of a NPC electronic database by Information Systems permitting submission of clinical practice issues by any employee, and to track the work of the PACTs and their outcomes. Information regarding the NPC and PACTs is also disseminated via e-mail; meeting minutes are posted on a dedicated NPC web-site located on the intranet as well as thorough the Division of Nursing's weekly electronic and quarterly newsletters. Mobile in-services and a ôliveö televised meeting with a continuous loop shown on the institutional television have also been used. An electronic discussion board is available to promote off-shift and off-site participation in PACTs. Since March of 2007, PACT participation from the clinical nurses has doubled. Fiscal year 2007 concluded with a 50% resolution rate including six new policies, five revised policies, two practice outcome projects, and submission of issues to existing institutional work groups. On average, four new issues are submitted each month and the growth continues. The implementation and success of a redesigned shared governance system takes time. Using technology to assist in communicating with and involving nurses has increased their ability to feel involved and empowered. Use of PACTs and technology have resulted in achieving resolution to practice challenges in a more efficient manner therefore, directly contributing to building a culture committed to improving clinical care for the patients and families.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:36:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:36:41Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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