2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182723
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Nurse Leader: Innovation in Nursing Education and Practice
Author(s):
Dennison, Pamela; Goins-Eplee, Susan
Author Details:
Pamela Dennison, MSN, RN, CNS-BC, CNL, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: pdd8h@virginia.edu; Susan Goins-Eplee, MSN, RN
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Faculty and clinical leaders collaborated to design and implement a Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) Program for second degree students. CNL Program participants and graduates exemplify Magnet ideals as they innovate nursing education and practice to improve patient care. ABSTRACT: An academic medical center provided the environment for a Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) Program for second degree students. Faculty and practice partners, administrators, managers, and staff nurses, partnered to develop this unique nursing education program to foster innovations in nursing practice and patient care. CNLs are Master's-prepared generalist nurses, educated as point-of-care leaders. CNL education emphasizes clinical and microsystem leadership, outcomes management, and use of technology. As the CNL program matures, outcomes are exceeding expectations. The CNL Program is guided by a Steering Committee comprised of School of Nursing and Medical Center staff. A bold decision was to have all clinical education provided in preceptor-student dyads, supported by clinical faculty. This model acquaints students with the reality of clinical practice while supported by experienced, knowledgeable staff nurses. Students complete 980 clinical hours with their preceptors. Classes are block-scheduled to allow for maximal flexibility, facilitating student-preceptor scheduling. To date, 250 staff nurses have guided clinical experiences for 3 cohorts of CNL students. Experiences occur in medical, surgical, emergency, critical care, obstetrics, ambulatory, home care and community settings. Culminating courses require 500 clinical hours in a practice setting to help students gain practice mastery in a CNL role. Students, working with preceptors, design and implement leadership projects. Projects have included nurse-patient goal setting to meet National Patient Safety Goals, initiatives to preserve wisdom by retaining older nurses in practice, reducing catheter-associated infections, and improving pain re-assessments. Many projects continue beyond the students' graduation. Several projects have been presented in national venues, providing professional benefits to graduates and preceptors. Additional outcomes include rewards for preceptors that support advancement and retention, recruitment of CNL graduates, and strengthened practice-education partnerships. Program enrollment is thriving and the Medical Center has recruited about fifty percent of program graduates who are actualizing the CNL vision. The CNL Program reflects the Magnet ideals of nursing leadership in innovation, collaboration and practice excellence. REFERENCES: AACN (February 2007). White paper on the education and role of the Clinical Nurse LeaderTM American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Harris, JL, Tornabeni, J, Walters, SE. (October 2006). The Clinical Nurse LeaderTM : A valued member of the healthcare team. Journal of Nursing Administration, 36(10), 446-449. Long, KA. (March-April 2004). Preparing nurses for the 21st century: Re-envisioning nursing education and practice. Journal of Professional Nursing, 20(2), 82-88. Palmer, SP et al. (November-December 2005). Nursing education and service collaboration: Making a difference in the clinical learning environment. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 36(6). 271-276. Stanhope, M, Turner, LP. (September 2006). Diffusion of the Clinical Nurse LeaderTM innovation. Journal of Nursing Administration, 36(9), 385-388. Stanley, J. et al. (March-April 2007). Implementing innovation through education-practice partnerships. Nursing Outlook, 55(2), 67-73. Tornabeni, J, Stanhope, M, Wiggins, M. (March 2006). The CNLTM vision. Journal of Nursing Administration, 36(3), 103-108.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Nurse Leader: Innovation in Nursing Education and Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDennison, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoins-Eplee, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Dennison, MSN, RN, CNS-BC, CNL, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: pdd8h@virginia.edu; Susan Goins-Eplee, MSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182723-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Faculty and clinical leaders collaborated to design and implement a Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) Program for second degree students. CNL Program participants and graduates exemplify Magnet ideals as they innovate nursing education and practice to improve patient care. ABSTRACT: An academic medical center provided the environment for a Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) Program for second degree students. Faculty and practice partners, administrators, managers, and staff nurses, partnered to develop this unique nursing education program to foster innovations in nursing practice and patient care. CNLs are Master's-prepared generalist nurses, educated as point-of-care leaders. CNL education emphasizes clinical and microsystem leadership, outcomes management, and use of technology. As the CNL program matures, outcomes are exceeding expectations. The CNL Program is guided by a Steering Committee comprised of School of Nursing and Medical Center staff. A bold decision was to have all clinical education provided in preceptor-student dyads, supported by clinical faculty. This model acquaints students with the reality of clinical practice while supported by experienced, knowledgeable staff nurses. Students complete 980 clinical hours with their preceptors. Classes are block-scheduled to allow for maximal flexibility, facilitating student-preceptor scheduling. To date, 250 staff nurses have guided clinical experiences for 3 cohorts of CNL students. Experiences occur in medical, surgical, emergency, critical care, obstetrics, ambulatory, home care and community settings. Culminating courses require 500 clinical hours in a practice setting to help students gain practice mastery in a CNL role. Students, working with preceptors, design and implement leadership projects. Projects have included nurse-patient goal setting to meet National Patient Safety Goals, initiatives to preserve wisdom by retaining older nurses in practice, reducing catheter-associated infections, and improving pain re-assessments. Many projects continue beyond the students' graduation. Several projects have been presented in national venues, providing professional benefits to graduates and preceptors. Additional outcomes include rewards for preceptors that support advancement and retention, recruitment of CNL graduates, and strengthened practice-education partnerships. Program enrollment is thriving and the Medical Center has recruited about fifty percent of program graduates who are actualizing the CNL vision. The CNL Program reflects the Magnet ideals of nursing leadership in innovation, collaboration and practice excellence. REFERENCES: AACN (February 2007). White paper on the education and role of the Clinical Nurse LeaderTM American Association of Colleges of Nursing. Harris, JL, Tornabeni, J, Walters, SE. (October 2006). The Clinical Nurse LeaderTM : A valued member of the healthcare team. Journal of Nursing Administration, 36(10), 446-449. Long, KA. (March-April 2004). Preparing nurses for the 21st century: Re-envisioning nursing education and practice. Journal of Professional Nursing, 20(2), 82-88. Palmer, SP et al. (November-December 2005). Nursing education and service collaboration: Making a difference in the clinical learning environment. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 36(6). 271-276. Stanhope, M, Turner, LP. (September 2006). Diffusion of the Clinical Nurse LeaderTM innovation. Journal of Nursing Administration, 36(9), 385-388. Stanley, J. et al. (March-April 2007). Implementing innovation through education-practice partnerships. Nursing Outlook, 55(2), 67-73. Tornabeni, J, Stanhope, M, Wiggins, M. (March 2006). The CNLTM vision. Journal of Nursing Administration, 36(3), 103-108.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:37:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:37:16Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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