2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182730
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Promoting Nursing Excellence Through Nurse Peer Review
Author(s):
Driscoll, Margaret; Branowicki, Patricia
Author Details:
Margaret Driscoll, BSN, JD, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: margaret.driscoll@childrens.harvard.edu; Patricia Branowicki, MS, RN, CNAA
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Nurse Peer Review (NPR) has resulted in individual and system-wide changes, enhanced nursing practice and improved collaboration among various nursing specialties. Learn how NPR established a framework for expert nurses to evaluate nursing practice within the context of an adverse event. ABSTRACT: Background Nurse competency and compliance with standards is critical to nursing quality. Historically, mentorship and ongoing employee review were the predominant mechanisms used to ensure competency and compliance, and address adverse events in which either is called into question. In 2006, nurse leaders recognized that selected events would benefit from an additional level of review and created the nurse peer review panel (NPRP). Description The NPRP is composed of 12 expert nurses from diverse practice settings who receive special training in the Nurse Practice Act, professional standards of practice, and techniques for conducting a case review. Each member must demonstrate the following characteristics: a reputation for clinical excellence; the ability to skillfully question and evaluate nursing practice; expert clinical judgment and reasoning; experience with identifying and helping to resolve ethical and clinical concerns; proficiency with systems thinking; aptitude for recognizing and incorporating differences in the provision of care; and commitment to the process of independent and evidence based nursing peer review (NPR). The members of NPRP remain strictly anonymous. At the request of the Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) or the Nurse Executive Committee for Quality, a NPR team will be formed to conduct an event review. Each team consists of three panel members with one member identified as the chair. The review follows a structured format and is completed within 30 days. The team completes a formal evaluation of individual nursing performance, but does not make recommendations regarding remedies or discipline. The written report is shared with the CNO and relevant leaders. The evaluation is reviewed with the individual nurse to discuss and identify opportunities to improve nursing practice. Findings are confidential; however, information about systems issues is shared more broadly to promote systematic changes to benefit patient care and improve outcomes. Conclusion The NPRP has reviewed 7 events since its inception. This new process has resulted in both individual and system-wide changes, enhanced nursing practice and has improved collaboration among various nursing specialties. Establishing a framework for expert nurses to evaluate nursing practice within the context of an adverse event has provided an insightful view of the benefits the NPR process can have on strengthening nursing practice and promoting nursing excellence.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePromoting Nursing Excellence Through Nurse Peer Reviewen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDriscoll, Margareten_US
dc.contributor.authorBranowicki, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret Driscoll, BSN, JD, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: margaret.driscoll@childrens.harvard.edu; Patricia Branowicki, MS, RN, CNAAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182730-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: Nurse Peer Review (NPR) has resulted in individual and system-wide changes, enhanced nursing practice and improved collaboration among various nursing specialties. Learn how NPR established a framework for expert nurses to evaluate nursing practice within the context of an adverse event. ABSTRACT: Background Nurse competency and compliance with standards is critical to nursing quality. Historically, mentorship and ongoing employee review were the predominant mechanisms used to ensure competency and compliance, and address adverse events in which either is called into question. In 2006, nurse leaders recognized that selected events would benefit from an additional level of review and created the nurse peer review panel (NPRP). Description The NPRP is composed of 12 expert nurses from diverse practice settings who receive special training in the Nurse Practice Act, professional standards of practice, and techniques for conducting a case review. Each member must demonstrate the following characteristics: a reputation for clinical excellence; the ability to skillfully question and evaluate nursing practice; expert clinical judgment and reasoning; experience with identifying and helping to resolve ethical and clinical concerns; proficiency with systems thinking; aptitude for recognizing and incorporating differences in the provision of care; and commitment to the process of independent and evidence based nursing peer review (NPR). The members of NPRP remain strictly anonymous. At the request of the Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) or the Nurse Executive Committee for Quality, a NPR team will be formed to conduct an event review. Each team consists of three panel members with one member identified as the chair. The review follows a structured format and is completed within 30 days. The team completes a formal evaluation of individual nursing performance, but does not make recommendations regarding remedies or discipline. The written report is shared with the CNO and relevant leaders. The evaluation is reviewed with the individual nurse to discuss and identify opportunities to improve nursing practice. Findings are confidential; however, information about systems issues is shared more broadly to promote systematic changes to benefit patient care and improve outcomes. Conclusion The NPRP has reviewed 7 events since its inception. This new process has resulted in both individual and system-wide changes, enhanced nursing practice and has improved collaboration among various nursing specialties. Establishing a framework for expert nurses to evaluate nursing practice within the context of an adverse event has provided an insightful view of the benefits the NPR process can have on strengthening nursing practice and promoting nursing excellence.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:37:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:37:34Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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