2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182731
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
RN Certification, Nursing Processes, and Patient Outcomes
Author(s):
Dunton, Nancy
Author Details:
Nancy Dunton, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA, email: ndunton@kumc.edu
Abstract:
Podium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This presentation will provide the most rigorous evidence to date on the revalence of certified RNs in U.S. hospitals, their work environments, and their influence on nursing processes and patient outcomes. This information has value for nursing administrators and managers in designing staffing patterns that promote high quality healthcare. ABSTRACT: The purpose of this presentation is to describe a rigorous methodology for determining the number of certified RNs working in U.S. hospitals and to present data on the association between certification and nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. Nurse administrators and managers value the skills and experience of nationally certified RNs. Yet, there is little published evidence that demonstrates superior nursing processes or patient outcomes resulting from the inclusion of certified RNs in the patient care team. This presentation will provide the most rigorous evidence to date on the prevalence of certified RNs in hospitals, their work environments, and their influence on nursing processes and patient outcomes. This information has value for nursing administrators and managers in designing staffing patterns that promote high quality healthcare. The data for this analysis came from a national survey of over 200,000 RNs, conducted in 2007. The survey had a 70% response rate and contained validated measures of nurse job satisfaction and attitudes toward their work environment. These data were matched with data from over 500 hospitals, on a unit-by-unit basis, with data on nurse staffing levels, nursing processes and patient outcomes. The nurse staffing and patient outcomes indicators have been shown to be valid and reliable. Data were collected via the Internet, using protocols approved by an academic medical center's institutional review board. Simple descriptive statistics were used, in addition to multi-level models The results show that approximately 19% of s RNs working in acute care settings hold certifications granted by a national nursing specialty organization. The percentage of certifications has increased since 2001. Certified RNs are most prevalent on critical care and rehabilitation units, although approximately half of certified RNs work in critical care, peri-op, and medical or surgical units. A higher percentage of certified RNs was associated with a lower fall rate and with more accurate pressure ulcer identification and staging. There was an anomalous association between percent certified and the percentage of patients at risk of a pressure ulcer who had a prevention protocol in place. The results provide some of the first broadly-based evidence on the value of certified RNs. Nurse administrators can use this evidence to justify expenditures that support RNs in obtaining certifications and the hiring of more certified RNs. REFERENCES: Allen, D.E, & Girard, N.J. (1992). Attitudes toward certification: A pilot study. AORN Journal, 55(3), 817-829. American Nurses Credentialing Center. (2002). The survey of the certifying organizations for Registered Nurses in the United States. Washington, DC: American Nurses Publishing. Blais Gumper, S. (2005). Certification dans une specialite infirmiere. Perspective infirmiere, 2(3), 34. Bulechek, G., & Maas, M. (1994). Nursing certification: A matter for the professional organization. In J. McCloskey & H. Grace (Eds.), Current Issues in Nursing - 3rd edition (pp. 327-335). St. Louis: C.V. Mosby. Faherty, B. (1991). Why bother getting certified? Home Healthcare Nurse, 9(4), 29-31. Fitzpatrick, M.A. (2003). Certified practice: We owe it to our patients and ourselves. Nursing Management, 34(3), 6. Flarey, D.L. (2000). Is certification the current gold standard? JONA, Healthcare, Law, Ethics, and Regulation, 2, 43-45. Fordham, P., & Martinez, J. (2005). Certificate vs. certification. Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing, 7(6), 305. Kenney, S., Ross, A., & Roberts, P.L. (2006). Certification and magnet hospitals. American Journal of Nursing, 106(7), 74-76. Meyer, J. S. (1991). Registration, licensure, and certification: Understanding the value of each. Diabetes Educator, 17(1), 13. Parker, J. (1994). Development of the American Board of Nursing Specialties (1991-1993). Nursing Management, 25(1), 33-35. Ridenour, J. (2003). The role of nursing licensure and certification in society. Creative Nursing, 9(2), 13. Roberts, D. (2004). ONC - The real magnet destination. Orthopaedic Nursing, 23(2), 100. Schenk, J.J., & Lewis, C.K. (1999). Credentialing: A paradox for the 21st century. Nursing Leadership Forum, 4(1), 14-17. Winter, E.J.S., Pugh, L.C., & Riley-Giomarisa, O. (1992). Is certification for you? Nursing, 22(1), 88-93.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRN Certification, Nursing Processes, and Patient Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDunton, Nancyen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy Dunton, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas, USA, email: ndunton@kumc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182731-
dc.description.abstractPodium Presentation: BRIEF DESCRIPTION: This presentation will provide the most rigorous evidence to date on the revalence of certified RNs in U.S. hospitals, their work environments, and their influence on nursing processes and patient outcomes. This information has value for nursing administrators and managers in designing staffing patterns that promote high quality healthcare. ABSTRACT: The purpose of this presentation is to describe a rigorous methodology for determining the number of certified RNs working in U.S. hospitals and to present data on the association between certification and nursing-sensitive patient outcomes. Nurse administrators and managers value the skills and experience of nationally certified RNs. Yet, there is little published evidence that demonstrates superior nursing processes or patient outcomes resulting from the inclusion of certified RNs in the patient care team. This presentation will provide the most rigorous evidence to date on the prevalence of certified RNs in hospitals, their work environments, and their influence on nursing processes and patient outcomes. This information has value for nursing administrators and managers in designing staffing patterns that promote high quality healthcare. The data for this analysis came from a national survey of over 200,000 RNs, conducted in 2007. The survey had a 70% response rate and contained validated measures of nurse job satisfaction and attitudes toward their work environment. These data were matched with data from over 500 hospitals, on a unit-by-unit basis, with data on nurse staffing levels, nursing processes and patient outcomes. The nurse staffing and patient outcomes indicators have been shown to be valid and reliable. Data were collected via the Internet, using protocols approved by an academic medical center's institutional review board. Simple descriptive statistics were used, in addition to multi-level models The results show that approximately 19% of s RNs working in acute care settings hold certifications granted by a national nursing specialty organization. The percentage of certifications has increased since 2001. Certified RNs are most prevalent on critical care and rehabilitation units, although approximately half of certified RNs work in critical care, peri-op, and medical or surgical units. A higher percentage of certified RNs was associated with a lower fall rate and with more accurate pressure ulcer identification and staging. There was an anomalous association between percent certified and the percentage of patients at risk of a pressure ulcer who had a prevention protocol in place. The results provide some of the first broadly-based evidence on the value of certified RNs. Nurse administrators can use this evidence to justify expenditures that support RNs in obtaining certifications and the hiring of more certified RNs. REFERENCES: Allen, D.E, & Girard, N.J. (1992). Attitudes toward certification: A pilot study. AORN Journal, 55(3), 817-829. American Nurses Credentialing Center. (2002). The survey of the certifying organizations for Registered Nurses in the United States. Washington, DC: American Nurses Publishing. Blais Gumper, S. (2005). Certification dans une specialite infirmiere. Perspective infirmiere, 2(3), 34. Bulechek, G., & Maas, M. (1994). Nursing certification: A matter for the professional organization. In J. McCloskey & H. Grace (Eds.), Current Issues in Nursing - 3rd edition (pp. 327-335). St. Louis: C.V. Mosby. Faherty, B. (1991). Why bother getting certified? Home Healthcare Nurse, 9(4), 29-31. Fitzpatrick, M.A. (2003). Certified practice: We owe it to our patients and ourselves. Nursing Management, 34(3), 6. Flarey, D.L. (2000). Is certification the current gold standard? JONA, Healthcare, Law, Ethics, and Regulation, 2, 43-45. Fordham, P., & Martinez, J. (2005). Certificate vs. certification. Journal of Hospice & Palliative Nursing, 7(6), 305. Kenney, S., Ross, A., & Roberts, P.L. (2006). Certification and magnet hospitals. American Journal of Nursing, 106(7), 74-76. Meyer, J. S. (1991). Registration, licensure, and certification: Understanding the value of each. Diabetes Educator, 17(1), 13. Parker, J. (1994). Development of the American Board of Nursing Specialties (1991-1993). Nursing Management, 25(1), 33-35. Ridenour, J. (2003). The role of nursing licensure and certification in society. Creative Nursing, 9(2), 13. Roberts, D. (2004). ONC - The real magnet destination. Orthopaedic Nursing, 23(2), 100. Schenk, J.J., & Lewis, C.K. (1999). Credentialing: A paradox for the 21st century. Nursing Leadership Forum, 4(1), 14-17. Winter, E.J.S., Pugh, L.C., & Riley-Giomarisa, O. (1992). Is certification for you? Nursing, 22(1), 88-93.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:37:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:37:37Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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