2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182738
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Nurses Make an Evidence-Based Business Case for Additional Care Hours
Author(s):
Feil, Michelle; Czekanski, Jill
Author Details:
Michelle Feil, MSN, CRNP, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: feilm@uphs.upenn.edu; Jill Czekanski, BSN, RN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: In response to a dramatic rise in patient acuity over a one year period, clinical nurses on a 39-bed medical telemetry unit made an evidence-based business case for more staff and improved nurse-patient ratios. The nurses voiced their concerns to the Nurse Manager (NM)/Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) unit leadership team. Using their unique role skill sets, the NM and CNS supported the clinical nurses in expressing their need for more nurses via an evidence-based and data-driven budget proposal to administration for increased nursing hours per patient day (NHPPD). To provide an evidence-based framework for the staffing proposal, the CNS performed a search of the research literature related to nurse staffing, patient acuity, and patient, nurse and hospital outcomes. Research linking improved nurse-patient ratios with patient outcomes show; fewer adverse events and complications, reduced length of stay, and lower mortality. Improved nurse staffing also decreases workplace injuries, burnout and turnover, and improves staff satisfaction. Together these outcomes directly translate to overall cost savings for hospitals. (Ref. 1,2,3,4,5) The NM organized meetings with key administrators who were able to give an audience to the clinical nurses and in turn participate in the data-collection process to quantify this increase in patient acuity. This interdisciplinary collaboration resulted in a well-researched and persuasive proposal for enhanced nursing care hours. The group compared the first four months of FY2005 to the same 4 month period of FY2006 for acuity measures. Supporting data was found in the All-Payer Related (APR) Case Mix Index (CMI) and the APR CMI severity and mortality risk ratings, validating the original subjective report of the clinical nurses. Under the guidance of nursing administration staffing levels were benchmarked with peer institutions. The final goal for NHPPD was set at the 50th percentile for our cohort. The final staffing proposal was brought before...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: 1 Needleman, Jack, Buerhaus, Peter I., et al., "Nurse staffing and patient outcomes in hospitals," Final Report, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, February 28, 2001. 2 Aiken, L.H., "Superior outcomes for magnet hospitals: The evidence base," in M.L. McClure and A.S. Hinshaw (Eds.), Magnet hospitals revisited: Attraction and retention of professional nurses (pp.61-81). Washington DC, American Nurses Publishing, January 2002. 3 Aiken, L. H., Clarke, S., et al., "Hospital nurse staffing and patient mortality, nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction," JAMA, October 2002. 4 Joint Commission, "Health Care at the Crossroads: Strategies for Addressing the Evolving Nursing Crisis," Joint Commission, September 2005. 5 Rothberg, M. B., Abraham, I., Lindenauer, P. K., and Rose, D. N., "Improving Nurse-To-Patient Staffing Ratios as a Cost-Effective Patient Safety Intervention," Medical Care, August 2005.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Nurses Make an Evidence-Based Business Case for Additional Care Hoursen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFeil, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorCzekanski, Jillen_US
dc.author.detailsMichelle Feil, MSN, CRNP, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: feilm@uphs.upenn.edu; Jill Czekanski, BSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182738-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: In response to a dramatic rise in patient acuity over a one year period, clinical nurses on a 39-bed medical telemetry unit made an evidence-based business case for more staff and improved nurse-patient ratios. The nurses voiced their concerns to the Nurse Manager (NM)/Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) unit leadership team. Using their unique role skill sets, the NM and CNS supported the clinical nurses in expressing their need for more nurses via an evidence-based and data-driven budget proposal to administration for increased nursing hours per patient day (NHPPD). To provide an evidence-based framework for the staffing proposal, the CNS performed a search of the research literature related to nurse staffing, patient acuity, and patient, nurse and hospital outcomes. Research linking improved nurse-patient ratios with patient outcomes show; fewer adverse events and complications, reduced length of stay, and lower mortality. Improved nurse staffing also decreases workplace injuries, burnout and turnover, and improves staff satisfaction. Together these outcomes directly translate to overall cost savings for hospitals. (Ref. 1,2,3,4,5) The NM organized meetings with key administrators who were able to give an audience to the clinical nurses and in turn participate in the data-collection process to quantify this increase in patient acuity. This interdisciplinary collaboration resulted in a well-researched and persuasive proposal for enhanced nursing care hours. The group compared the first four months of FY2005 to the same 4 month period of FY2006 for acuity measures. Supporting data was found in the All-Payer Related (APR) Case Mix Index (CMI) and the APR CMI severity and mortality risk ratings, validating the original subjective report of the clinical nurses. Under the guidance of nursing administration staffing levels were benchmarked with peer institutions. The final goal for NHPPD was set at the 50th percentile for our cohort. The final staffing proposal was brought before...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: 1 Needleman, Jack, Buerhaus, Peter I., et al., "Nurse staffing and patient outcomes in hospitals," Final Report, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, February 28, 2001. 2 Aiken, L.H., "Superior outcomes for magnet hospitals: The evidence base," in M.L. McClure and A.S. Hinshaw (Eds.), Magnet hospitals revisited: Attraction and retention of professional nurses (pp.61-81). Washington DC, American Nurses Publishing, January 2002. 3 Aiken, L. H., Clarke, S., et al., "Hospital nurse staffing and patient mortality, nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction," JAMA, October 2002. 4 Joint Commission, "Health Care at the Crossroads: Strategies for Addressing the Evolving Nursing Crisis," Joint Commission, September 2005. 5 Rothberg, M. B., Abraham, I., Lindenauer, P. K., and Rose, D. N., "Improving Nurse-To-Patient Staffing Ratios as a Cost-Effective Patient Safety Intervention," Medical Care, August 2005.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:37:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:37:55Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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