2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182740
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of NICU Culture on Back to Sleep
Author(s):
Fucanan, Fermilia; Carrier, Carol; Foster, Jenni
Author Details:
Fermilia Fucanan, BSN, RN, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: fafucana@texaschildrenshospital.org; Carol Carrier, MSN, RN; Jenni Foster, RN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Purpose: The purpose of the Unit Practice Council (UPC-staff directed committee) Performance Improvement project was to implement evidence-based practice related to Sudden Infant Death prevention in parent education by staff modeling of Back To Sleep recommendations and verbal teaching with every family for effective parent education. Background: The setting is a level II neonatal unit of 62 beds with 50 to 60 percent premature infant occupancy and 1200 to 1500 admissions annually. Premature infants are positioned with devices to support their neuromotor system. Nurses teach SIDS prevention to parents at discharge, but bedding and infant position does not always reflect SIDS recommendations. The literature review showed that parents of premature infants often place their infants prone after discharge from Neonatal Intensive Units. Studies have shown that parents are more likely to do what they observe health care providers do rather than what they are told. Modeling care was shown to have more impact on parent compliance with supine sleep positioning after discharge. Methods: Nursing staff was educated on SIDS prevention methods by lecture, demonstration, and discussion with emphasis on the latest evidence for modeling SIDS prevention for parents. Staff were instructed on the use of UPC designed cards to identify infants ready for back to sleep and the use of "Progress Wheels" that illustrate progress in transition to supine sleeping. Progress wheels serve as a visual reminder to all disciplines on progress to supine positioning of infant from 34 weeks and older. This technique was also a trigger for staff to model SIDS prevention recommendations. Trained UPC members conducted data collection by observation and chart audit before education and 6 months post education. Results: Pre-education and post-education data results showed a post-education percent change in improvement in all indicators shown here as pre and post percentages and percent change: appropriate...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: Stastny PF, et al. Infant sleep positioning by nursery staff and mothers in newborn hospital nurseries. Nursing Research. 2004; 53(2):122-129 American Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. The changing concept of sudden infant death syndrome: Diagnostic coding shifts, controversies regarding the sleeping environment, and new variables to consider in reducing risk. Pediatrics. 2005; 116:1245-1255. Vernacchio, et al. Sleep position of low birth weight infants. Pediatrics. 2003; 111(3):633-640.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of NICU Culture on Back to Sleepen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFucanan, Fermiliaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarrier, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.authorFoster, Jennien_US
dc.author.detailsFermilia Fucanan, BSN, RN, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: fafucana@texaschildrenshospital.org; Carol Carrier, MSN, RN; Jenni Foster, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182740-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Purpose: The purpose of the Unit Practice Council (UPC-staff directed committee) Performance Improvement project was to implement evidence-based practice related to Sudden Infant Death prevention in parent education by staff modeling of Back To Sleep recommendations and verbal teaching with every family for effective parent education. Background: The setting is a level II neonatal unit of 62 beds with 50 to 60 percent premature infant occupancy and 1200 to 1500 admissions annually. Premature infants are positioned with devices to support their neuromotor system. Nurses teach SIDS prevention to parents at discharge, but bedding and infant position does not always reflect SIDS recommendations. The literature review showed that parents of premature infants often place their infants prone after discharge from Neonatal Intensive Units. Studies have shown that parents are more likely to do what they observe health care providers do rather than what they are told. Modeling care was shown to have more impact on parent compliance with supine sleep positioning after discharge. Methods: Nursing staff was educated on SIDS prevention methods by lecture, demonstration, and discussion with emphasis on the latest evidence for modeling SIDS prevention for parents. Staff were instructed on the use of UPC designed cards to identify infants ready for back to sleep and the use of "Progress Wheels" that illustrate progress in transition to supine sleeping. Progress wheels serve as a visual reminder to all disciplines on progress to supine positioning of infant from 34 weeks and older. This technique was also a trigger for staff to model SIDS prevention recommendations. Trained UPC members conducted data collection by observation and chart audit before education and 6 months post education. Results: Pre-education and post-education data results showed a post-education percent change in improvement in all indicators shown here as pre and post percentages and percent change: appropriate...[Please contact the primary investigator for more information about this poster presentation.] REFERENCES: Stastny PF, et al. Infant sleep positioning by nursery staff and mothers in newborn hospital nurseries. Nursing Research. 2004; 53(2):122-129 American Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. The changing concept of sudden infant death syndrome: Diagnostic coding shifts, controversies regarding the sleeping environment, and new variables to consider in reducing risk. Pediatrics. 2005; 116:1245-1255. Vernacchio, et al. Sleep position of low birth weight infants. Pediatrics. 2003; 111(3):633-640.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:38:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:38:01Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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