2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182748
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse-Led Clinics: An Illustration of Excellence in Nursing Practice
Author(s):
Halford, Michele; Poutoa, Debbie M.
Author Details:
Michele Halford, RN, BA, BN, PG Dip, Nursing Development Unit, Hutt Valley District Health Board, Lower Hutt, New Zealand; Debbie M. Poutoa, RN, BN, PG Cert
Abstract:
New Zealand has been a late starter in acknowledging autonomous or specialised nursing practice and nurse practitioner development is still somewhat limited. Over many years, however, our small community hospital has introduced a number of nurse-led initiatives. These have evolved both from local community need and the drive of individual nurses who have developed skills and expertise in their chosen area of interest. Nurses within these specialist areas work in collaboration with physicians, other nurses and allied health practitioners, in clinic settings, or in the community. The services provided by these nurses within their specialised scope of practice, fill vacant niches in the health care continuum. They are not alternatives to doctors, but clinicians in their own right focusing on providing an expert nursing approach to patient care. Clinical Nurse Specialists in our organisation provide expert nursing services to inpatients and patients in our community. Examples of some of the current nurse-led clinics established in the organisation include: Heart Failure and Cardiac Rehabilitation Clinic; Rheumatology Nurse Clinic; Cardiac Clinical Nurse Consultant Clinic; Respiratory Nurse Clinic; Adult, Paediatric and Pacific Island Diabetes Nurse-Led Clinics. All nurse-led clinics physically assess patients, organise tests and x-rays, provide relevant education and information, plan for patients' admission and discharge, and communicate findings with their colleagues (including those in primary care settings). This process improves the patients' health and suitability for theatre, reduces the need for physician or surgeon follow-up clinics, reduces the chances or provides early detection of complications, ensures smooth transition from hospital to home, and most importantly improves patient satisfaction. This presentation will discuss the evolution of nurse-led clinics and services in our organisation over a ten-year period, outlining the rationale and evidence for their establishment. It will also look at nurse involvement in the set-up and service delivery, the nursing service provided, interdisciplinary collaboration and patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
The 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse-Led Clinics: An Illustration of Excellence in Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHalford, Micheleen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoutoa, Debbie M.en_US
dc.author.detailsMichele Halford, RN, BA, BN, PG Dip, Nursing Development Unit, Hutt Valley District Health Board, Lower Hutt, New Zealand; Debbie M. Poutoa, RN, BN, PG Certen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182748-
dc.description.abstractNew Zealand has been a late starter in acknowledging autonomous or specialised nursing practice and nurse practitioner development is still somewhat limited. Over many years, however, our small community hospital has introduced a number of nurse-led initiatives. These have evolved both from local community need and the drive of individual nurses who have developed skills and expertise in their chosen area of interest. Nurses within these specialist areas work in collaboration with physicians, other nurses and allied health practitioners, in clinic settings, or in the community. The services provided by these nurses within their specialised scope of practice, fill vacant niches in the health care continuum. They are not alternatives to doctors, but clinicians in their own right focusing on providing an expert nursing approach to patient care. Clinical Nurse Specialists in our organisation provide expert nursing services to inpatients and patients in our community. Examples of some of the current nurse-led clinics established in the organisation include: Heart Failure and Cardiac Rehabilitation Clinic; Rheumatology Nurse Clinic; Cardiac Clinical Nurse Consultant Clinic; Respiratory Nurse Clinic; Adult, Paediatric and Pacific Island Diabetes Nurse-Led Clinics. All nurse-led clinics physically assess patients, organise tests and x-rays, provide relevant education and information, plan for patients' admission and discharge, and communicate findings with their colleagues (including those in primary care settings). This process improves the patients' health and suitability for theatre, reduces the need for physician or surgeon follow-up clinics, reduces the chances or provides early detection of complications, ensures smooth transition from hospital to home, and most importantly improves patient satisfaction. This presentation will discuss the evolution of nurse-led clinics and services in our organisation over a ten-year period, outlining the rationale and evidence for their establishment. It will also look at nurse involvement in the set-up and service delivery, the nursing service provided, interdisciplinary collaboration and patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:38:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:38:22Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionThe 12th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 15-17 October, 2008 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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