Palliative Care from the Inside Out: Delivering Effective End of Life Services and Creating a Nursing Education Consortium

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182753
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Palliative Care from the Inside Out: Delivering Effective End of Life Services and Creating a Nursing Education Consortium
Author(s):
Bohnenkamp, Susan
Author Details:
Susan Bohnenkamp, MS, APRN,BC,CNS,CCM, University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: sbohnenkamp@umcaz.edu
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Significance and Background: Palliative medicine is recognized as an essential component of comprehensive care centers. XXX is a leading referral site for the State of Arizona, but prior to initiation of this project had no organized palliative care services. Purpose: To implement a palliative care pilot project with the inpatient medical oncology team; and To establish a corps of "Palliative Care Resource Nurses." Interventions: The interdisciplinary PSCS was created from preexisting clinicians within UMC. Bi-weekly PSCS meetings are held to discuss patient needs, and at least one PSCS member participates daily in oncology ward rounds. Selected RNs will participate in monthly ELNEC programs, which will also be broadcast using telemedicine technology to nurses throughout Arizona. Evaluation: Criteria for referral and methods to effectively market the PSCS to oncology attendings continue to be refined. Formalized assessment and outcome measurement tools are being developed and implemented. Interdisciplinary collaboration has been very successful, although challenges arise with workload balance, as members of the PSCS must still manage their "regular" clinical responsibilities. Discussion: The implementation of a pilot PSCS, along with the concurrent training of a cadre of Palliative Care Resource Nurses, will enhance the delivery of palliative care and improve the oncology nurse's ability to identify and manage the complex, holistic needs of seriously ill patients. It is hoped that results from this pilot work will serve as a foundation for expanding palliative care within XXX, and may also serve as a guide for other hospitals with limited resources whom desire to develop palliative care services. References: Center to Advance Palliative Care. (2006). Retrieved December 30, 2006 from http://www.capc.org/building-a-hospital-based -palliative-care-program/case/outcomes/. Center to Advance Palliative Care Sutton Group. (2004). 2004 Crosswalk of JCAHO standards and palliative care-with PC policies, procedures, and assessment tools. Retrieved April 26, 2005, from http://www.capc.org/building-a-hospital-based-palliative-care-program/case/hospitalbenefits/support-from-capc/capc_publications/JCAHO-crosswalk.pdf. Clarke, E.B., Curtis, J.R., Luce, J.M., Levy, M, Danis, M., Nelson, J., & Solomon, M.Z. (2003). Quality indicators for end-of-life in the intensive care unit. Critical Care Medicine, 31(9), 2255-2262. Clinical practice guidelines for quality palliative care. (2004). Brooklyn, NY: National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. Lonberger, E.A., Russell, C.L., & Burton, S.M. (1997). The effects of palliative care on patient charges. Journal of Nursing Administration, 27(11), 23-26. Meier, D.E., Spragens, L.H., & Sutton, S. (2004). A Guide to Building a Hospital-Based Palliative Care Program. New York: Center to Advance Palliative Care. Moyer, P. (2005). Palliative care team linked to more satisfaction than usual care. Retrieved April 25, 2005, from http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/498062. Naik, G. (March 10, 2004). Final days: Unlikely ways to cut hospital costs. Wall Street Journal, p. A1. Payne, S.K., Coyne, P., & Smith, T.J. (2002). The health economics of palliative care. Oncology, 16(6), 801-812. Truog, R.D., Cist, A.F.M., Brackett, S.E., Burns, J.P, Curley, M.A.Q., Danis, M, Rothenber, D.M., Sprung, C.L., Webb, S.A., Wlody, G.S., & Hurford, W.E. ( 2001). Recommendations for end-of-life care in the intensive care unit: The Ethics Committee of the Society of Critical Care Medicine. Critical Care Medicine, 29(2), 2332-2348.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePalliative Care from the Inside Out: Delivering Effective End of Life Services and Creating a Nursing Education Consortiumen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBohnenkamp, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Bohnenkamp, MS, APRN,BC,CNS,CCM, University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: sbohnenkamp@umcaz.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182753-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Significance and Background: Palliative medicine is recognized as an essential component of comprehensive care centers. XXX is a leading referral site for the State of Arizona, but prior to initiation of this project had no organized palliative care services. Purpose: To implement a palliative care pilot project with the inpatient medical oncology team; and To establish a corps of "Palliative Care Resource Nurses." Interventions: The interdisciplinary PSCS was created from preexisting clinicians within UMC. Bi-weekly PSCS meetings are held to discuss patient needs, and at least one PSCS member participates daily in oncology ward rounds. Selected RNs will participate in monthly ELNEC programs, which will also be broadcast using telemedicine technology to nurses throughout Arizona. Evaluation: Criteria for referral and methods to effectively market the PSCS to oncology attendings continue to be refined. Formalized assessment and outcome measurement tools are being developed and implemented. Interdisciplinary collaboration has been very successful, although challenges arise with workload balance, as members of the PSCS must still manage their "regular" clinical responsibilities. Discussion: The implementation of a pilot PSCS, along with the concurrent training of a cadre of Palliative Care Resource Nurses, will enhance the delivery of palliative care and improve the oncology nurse's ability to identify and manage the complex, holistic needs of seriously ill patients. It is hoped that results from this pilot work will serve as a foundation for expanding palliative care within XXX, and may also serve as a guide for other hospitals with limited resources whom desire to develop palliative care services. References: Center to Advance Palliative Care. (2006). Retrieved December 30, 2006 from http://www.capc.org/building-a-hospital-based -palliative-care-program/case/outcomes/. Center to Advance Palliative Care Sutton Group. (2004). 2004 Crosswalk of JCAHO standards and palliative care-with PC policies, procedures, and assessment tools. Retrieved April 26, 2005, from http://www.capc.org/building-a-hospital-based-palliative-care-program/case/hospitalbenefits/support-from-capc/capc_publications/JCAHO-crosswalk.pdf. Clarke, E.B., Curtis, J.R., Luce, J.M., Levy, M, Danis, M., Nelson, J., & Solomon, M.Z. (2003). Quality indicators for end-of-life in the intensive care unit. Critical Care Medicine, 31(9), 2255-2262. Clinical practice guidelines for quality palliative care. (2004). Brooklyn, NY: National Consensus Project for Quality Palliative Care. Lonberger, E.A., Russell, C.L., & Burton, S.M. (1997). The effects of palliative care on patient charges. Journal of Nursing Administration, 27(11), 23-26. Meier, D.E., Spragens, L.H., & Sutton, S. (2004). A Guide to Building a Hospital-Based Palliative Care Program. New York: Center to Advance Palliative Care. Moyer, P. (2005). Palliative care team linked to more satisfaction than usual care. Retrieved April 25, 2005, from http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/498062. Naik, G. (March 10, 2004). Final days: Unlikely ways to cut hospital costs. Wall Street Journal, p. A1. Payne, S.K., Coyne, P., & Smith, T.J. (2002). The health economics of palliative care. Oncology, 16(6), 801-812. Truog, R.D., Cist, A.F.M., Brackett, S.E., Burns, J.P, Curley, M.A.Q., Danis, M, Rothenber, D.M., Sprung, C.L., Webb, S.A., Wlody, G.S., & Hurford, W.E. ( 2001). Recommendations for end-of-life care in the intensive care unit: The Ethics Committee of the Society of Critical Care Medicine. Critical Care Medicine, 29(2), 2332-2348.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:38:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:38:34Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.