2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182758
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Partnering with Travel Nurses on the Magnet Journey
Author(s):
Boyle, Deborah; Erving-Mengel, Tammi; Forte, Joan
Author Details:
Deborah Boyle, RN, MSN, AOCN, FAAN, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, email: Deborah.boyle@bannerhealth.com; Tammi Erving-Mengel, RN, MSN, C, High Point Regional Health System; Joan Forte, BSN, MBA, CNA-BC, Stanford University Hospital and Clinics
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: Controversy prevails regarding the presence of travel nurses in the pursuit of Magnet designation. Should a Magnet facility need travel nurses? Are they a liability or an asset? In reality, few large-scale hospitals today can exist without traveler nurses. Another certainty is that travel nurses can positively contribute to the Magnet journey. The historically-validated Forces of Magnetism require staff nurses to participate in shared governance, development of standards of practice, quality improvement, peer review, precepting/mentoring, and continued education. By using supplemental staffing judiciously, nursing leaders can facilitate core staff nurses' assumption of their full complement of professional role expectations. In this panel discussion, nursing leaders representing three Magnet facilities will describe their experiences with integrating travel nurses into the preparation and documentation phases of the submission process, and during the site visit. Panelists will describe use of travel nurses to stabilize a nursing unit, and to respond quickly to changing marketplace needs, such as opening new programs. Panelists will present and comment upon pertinent survey results obtained by their JCAHO-approved travel nurse company partner. Results include satisfaction survey results of 500 travel nurses and responses of CNOs and Magnet Coordinators at 136 Magnet facilities concerning their perceptions of use of travel nurses in their Magnet journeys. Travel nurses bring experience with clinical inquiry, evidence-based practice, innovative problem-solving, culturally-sensitive care, and exposure to numerous Magnet cultures. To assist those considering or preparing for the Magnet journey, panelists will share lessons learned, practical examples, and recommendations for possible replication in other facilities. References: Brady-Schwartz DC (2005). Further evidence on the Magnet recognition program: Implications for nursing leaders. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35, 397-403. Burke RL (2005). When bad things happen to good organizations: A focused approach to recovery using the essentials of Magnetism. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 29, 228-240. Cimiotti JP, Quinlan PM, Larson EL, Pastor DK, Lin SX, Stone PW (2005). The Magnet process and the perceived work environment of nurses. Nursing Research, 54, 384-390. Dunton, N., Gajewski., B., Klaus, S., & Pierson, B. (2006). Do Magnet facilities maintain their workforce magnetism? American Nurse Today, 1(3), 22 ? 23. Kramer M & Schmalenberg C (2005). Revisiting the essentials of Magnetism tool: There is more to adequate staffing than numbers. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35,188-198. Nursing2006 Editorial Staff (2006). How do agency nurses measure up? Nursing2006, 36(1), 35. Note: This research is not currently published. Aiken?s team is awaiting a publisher's decision and anticipates publication within the next few months. Smith, A.P. (2006). Paving and resurfacing the road to magnet: Part I. Nursing Economic$, 24(2), 112 ? 159. Wolf GA & Greenhouse PK (2006). A road map for creating a Magnet work environment. Journal of Nursing Administration,36, 458-462.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePartnering with Travel Nurses on the Magnet Journeyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorErving-Mengel, Tammien_US
dc.contributor.authorForte, Joanen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Boyle, RN, MSN, AOCN, FAAN, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, email: Deborah.boyle@bannerhealth.com; Tammi Erving-Mengel, RN, MSN, C, High Point Regional Health System; Joan Forte, BSN, MBA, CNA-BC, Stanford University Hospital and Clinicsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182758-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: Controversy prevails regarding the presence of travel nurses in the pursuit of Magnet designation. Should a Magnet facility need travel nurses? Are they a liability or an asset? In reality, few large-scale hospitals today can exist without traveler nurses. Another certainty is that travel nurses can positively contribute to the Magnet journey. The historically-validated Forces of Magnetism require staff nurses to participate in shared governance, development of standards of practice, quality improvement, peer review, precepting/mentoring, and continued education. By using supplemental staffing judiciously, nursing leaders can facilitate core staff nurses' assumption of their full complement of professional role expectations. In this panel discussion, nursing leaders representing three Magnet facilities will describe their experiences with integrating travel nurses into the preparation and documentation phases of the submission process, and during the site visit. Panelists will describe use of travel nurses to stabilize a nursing unit, and to respond quickly to changing marketplace needs, such as opening new programs. Panelists will present and comment upon pertinent survey results obtained by their JCAHO-approved travel nurse company partner. Results include satisfaction survey results of 500 travel nurses and responses of CNOs and Magnet Coordinators at 136 Magnet facilities concerning their perceptions of use of travel nurses in their Magnet journeys. Travel nurses bring experience with clinical inquiry, evidence-based practice, innovative problem-solving, culturally-sensitive care, and exposure to numerous Magnet cultures. To assist those considering or preparing for the Magnet journey, panelists will share lessons learned, practical examples, and recommendations for possible replication in other facilities. References: Brady-Schwartz DC (2005). Further evidence on the Magnet recognition program: Implications for nursing leaders. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35, 397-403. Burke RL (2005). When bad things happen to good organizations: A focused approach to recovery using the essentials of Magnetism. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 29, 228-240. Cimiotti JP, Quinlan PM, Larson EL, Pastor DK, Lin SX, Stone PW (2005). The Magnet process and the perceived work environment of nurses. Nursing Research, 54, 384-390. Dunton, N., Gajewski., B., Klaus, S., & Pierson, B. (2006). Do Magnet facilities maintain their workforce magnetism? American Nurse Today, 1(3), 22 ? 23. Kramer M & Schmalenberg C (2005). Revisiting the essentials of Magnetism tool: There is more to adequate staffing than numbers. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35,188-198. Nursing2006 Editorial Staff (2006). How do agency nurses measure up? Nursing2006, 36(1), 35. Note: This research is not currently published. Aiken?s team is awaiting a publisher's decision and anticipates publication within the next few months. Smith, A.P. (2006). Paving and resurfacing the road to magnet: Part I. Nursing Economic$, 24(2), 112 ? 159. Wolf GA & Greenhouse PK (2006). A road map for creating a Magnet work environment. Journal of Nursing Administration,36, 458-462.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:38:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:38:47Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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