2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182763
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pediatric Procedural Pain Prevention
Author(s):
Brown, Terri
Author Details:
Terri Brown, MSN, RN, CPN, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: tlbrown@texaschildrenshospital.org
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: Although literature on pain management in children has grown considerably, this knowledge has not been widely applied in practice. One of today's important initiatives among healthcare professionals of all disciplines is to move from tradition-based practice to evidence-based practice. The Procedural Pain Initiative focuses on evidence-based pain prevention strategies for procedures nurses commonly perform: peripheral intravenous (PIV) access, venipunctures, injections, and implantable port access. The Center for Research and Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) and the Clinical Practice Council collaborated to develop and successfully implement a Pediatric Procedural Pain Prevention Protocol utilizing EBP. The protocol facilitates nurses using professional judgment and clinical expertise coupled with patient and family preferences to choose medications within the protocol to prevent pain in procedures nurses commonly perform in all patients, at all times, and in all settings. The process and clinical protocol in this presentation have universal applicability in all settings where these nursing procedures are performed. Evidence-based practice approaches can be invaluable in influencing the culture of a hospital, department, or discipline. Silos of resistance to changes to support patients and their families can be overcome with EBP. The EBP Environment Model is used to provide clinicians, educators, researchers, and administrators with a template for implementing EBP in a clinical setting. The four major concepts constructing the EBP Environment Model include vision, engagement, integration, and evaluation of evidence. Three outcomes measures are presented: changes in nursing practice, efficiency of processes, and patient centered quality care. References: American Academy of Pediatrics and American Pain Society (2001). The assessment and management of acute pain in infants, children and adolescents. Pediatrics 108(3), 793-97. Balas E, Boren S (2000). Managing Clinical Knowledge for Health Care Improvement. Yearbook of Medical Informatics. National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD: 65-70. Bethel C (2000). Patient-centered care measures for the national health care quality report. Foundation for Accountability, Portland Or. Bishai R, Tadio A, Bar-Oz B, et al (1999). Relative efficacy of amethjocaine gel and lidocaine-prilocaine cream for port-a-cath puncture in children. Pediatrics 104(3): 31-33. Cassidy KL, et al (2001). A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the EMLA patch for the reduction of pain associated with intramuscular injection in four to six-year-old children. Acta Paediatrics 90: 1329-1336. Cavender K, Goff MD, Hollon EC, et al (2004). Parent's positioning and distracting children during venipuncture: Effects on children's pain, fear, and distress. Journal of Holistic Nursing 22(1): 32-56. Dahlquist L, Pendley J, Landthrip D, et al (2002). Distraction intervention for preschoolers undergoing intramuscular injections and subcutaneous port access. Health Psychology Jan: 21 (1): 94-99. Duff AJ (2003). Incorporating psychological approaches into routine paediatric venipuncture. Archives of Disease in Childhood 88: 931-937. Eichenfield LF, Funk A, Fallon-Friedlander S, et al (2005). A clinical study to evaluate the efficacy of Ela-Max as compared with eutectic mixture of local anesthetics cream for pain reduction of venipuncture in children. Pediatrics 109(6): 1092-1099. Fein JA, Boardman CR, Stevenson S, et al (1998). Saline with benzyl alcohol as intradermal anesthesia for intravenous line placement in children. Pediatric Emergency Care 14(2): 119-122. Foster, R, et al. (2005). Is the shotblocker effective in reducing immunization pain. Research News 12(1): 1.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePediatric Procedural Pain Preventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Terrien_US
dc.author.detailsTerri Brown, MSN, RN, CPN, Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA, email: tlbrown@texaschildrenshospital.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182763-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: Although literature on pain management in children has grown considerably, this knowledge has not been widely applied in practice. One of today's important initiatives among healthcare professionals of all disciplines is to move from tradition-based practice to evidence-based practice. The Procedural Pain Initiative focuses on evidence-based pain prevention strategies for procedures nurses commonly perform: peripheral intravenous (PIV) access, venipunctures, injections, and implantable port access. The Center for Research and Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) and the Clinical Practice Council collaborated to develop and successfully implement a Pediatric Procedural Pain Prevention Protocol utilizing EBP. The protocol facilitates nurses using professional judgment and clinical expertise coupled with patient and family preferences to choose medications within the protocol to prevent pain in procedures nurses commonly perform in all patients, at all times, and in all settings. The process and clinical protocol in this presentation have universal applicability in all settings where these nursing procedures are performed. Evidence-based practice approaches can be invaluable in influencing the culture of a hospital, department, or discipline. Silos of resistance to changes to support patients and their families can be overcome with EBP. The EBP Environment Model is used to provide clinicians, educators, researchers, and administrators with a template for implementing EBP in a clinical setting. The four major concepts constructing the EBP Environment Model include vision, engagement, integration, and evaluation of evidence. Three outcomes measures are presented: changes in nursing practice, efficiency of processes, and patient centered quality care. References: American Academy of Pediatrics and American Pain Society (2001). The assessment and management of acute pain in infants, children and adolescents. Pediatrics 108(3), 793-97. Balas E, Boren S (2000). Managing Clinical Knowledge for Health Care Improvement. Yearbook of Medical Informatics. National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD: 65-70. Bethel C (2000). Patient-centered care measures for the national health care quality report. Foundation for Accountability, Portland Or. Bishai R, Tadio A, Bar-Oz B, et al (1999). Relative efficacy of amethjocaine gel and lidocaine-prilocaine cream for port-a-cath puncture in children. Pediatrics 104(3): 31-33. Cassidy KL, et al (2001). A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the EMLA patch for the reduction of pain associated with intramuscular injection in four to six-year-old children. Acta Paediatrics 90: 1329-1336. Cavender K, Goff MD, Hollon EC, et al (2004). Parent's positioning and distracting children during venipuncture: Effects on children's pain, fear, and distress. Journal of Holistic Nursing 22(1): 32-56. Dahlquist L, Pendley J, Landthrip D, et al (2002). Distraction intervention for preschoolers undergoing intramuscular injections and subcutaneous port access. Health Psychology Jan: 21 (1): 94-99. Duff AJ (2003). Incorporating psychological approaches into routine paediatric venipuncture. Archives of Disease in Childhood 88: 931-937. Eichenfield LF, Funk A, Fallon-Friedlander S, et al (2005). A clinical study to evaluate the efficacy of Ela-Max as compared with eutectic mixture of local anesthetics cream for pain reduction of venipuncture in children. Pediatrics 109(6): 1092-1099. Fein JA, Boardman CR, Stevenson S, et al (1998). Saline with benzyl alcohol as intradermal anesthesia for intravenous line placement in children. Pediatric Emergency Care 14(2): 119-122. Foster, R, et al. (2005). Is the shotblocker effective in reducing immunization pain. Research News 12(1): 1.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:39:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:39:01Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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