2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182774
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Step by Step Approach to Decrease the Experience of Moral Distress in Staff Nurses
Author(s):
Cavanagh, Maureen; Newell-Helfant, Patricia; Prendergast, Jayne
Author Details:
Maureen Cavanagh, RN, MS, MAHCM, St. Peter's Hospital, Albany, New York, USA, email: mcavanagh@stpetershealthcare.org; Patricia Newell-Helfant, RNC, MS, CPNP; Jayne Prendergast, RN, CCRN, MS
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Title: A Step by Step Approach to Decrease the Experience of Moral Distress in Staff Nurses Purpose: The purpose of this program is to gauge the experience of moral distress in nurses working on one neonatal and two adult critical care units in a large acute care hospital setting and to assess the impact of select interventions aimed at reducing the level of moral distress. Background: It has been estimated that one in three practicing nurses experiences moral distress in the course of practicing their profession. Anecdotally, this phenomenon has been observed with increasing frequency in staff members working in our critical care areas. A collaborative effort of the Nursing Research Council and the Ethics: Resource Group established moral distress as a high priority to improve the work-life of nurses in the organization. Measurement of nurse moral distress before and after a series of planned interventions over the course of one year will provide important data which can inform environmental and behavioral changes aimed at improving the overall health of the workplace. Methodology: A voluntary written survey will be administered to staff in the Adult ICU, CCU and NICU areas. Corley's Moral Distress Survey which measures the intensity and the frequency of moral distress was utilized. Scores have been calculated for the initial survey and the tool will be re-administered in approximately nine to twelve months after a series of presentations, skill building sessions and focus groups are conducted with the staff in these areas. A twelve session program has been designed. Differences in the experiences of staff working with adults versus children/neonates will also be analyzed. Results: Results form the initial survey as well as an outline of intervention steps will be available at the time of the conference date. Implications for practice form the initial survey findings will be outlined and stumbling blocks to implementation will also be identified. [Please contact presenter for more information.] References: Corley, Mary (1995). Moral Distress of critical care nurses. American Journal of Critical Care, 4:280-285 Jameton, A. (1984). Nursing Practice: the Ethical Issues, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, Inc. Thomas, S. (2004). Transforming Nurses' Stress and Anger. New York, NY, Springer Publishing Co. wicks, R. (2006). Overcoming Secondary Stress in Medical and Nursing Practice. New York, NY, Oxford University Press.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Step by Step Approach to Decrease the Experience of Moral Distress in Staff Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCavanagh, Maureenen_US
dc.contributor.authorNewell-Helfant, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrendergast, Jayneen_US
dc.author.detailsMaureen Cavanagh, RN, MS, MAHCM, St. Peter's Hospital, Albany, New York, USA, email: mcavanagh@stpetershealthcare.org; Patricia Newell-Helfant, RNC, MS, CPNP; Jayne Prendergast, RN, CCRN, MSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182774-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Title: A Step by Step Approach to Decrease the Experience of Moral Distress in Staff Nurses Purpose: The purpose of this program is to gauge the experience of moral distress in nurses working on one neonatal and two adult critical care units in a large acute care hospital setting and to assess the impact of select interventions aimed at reducing the level of moral distress. Background: It has been estimated that one in three practicing nurses experiences moral distress in the course of practicing their profession. Anecdotally, this phenomenon has been observed with increasing frequency in staff members working in our critical care areas. A collaborative effort of the Nursing Research Council and the Ethics: Resource Group established moral distress as a high priority to improve the work-life of nurses in the organization. Measurement of nurse moral distress before and after a series of planned interventions over the course of one year will provide important data which can inform environmental and behavioral changes aimed at improving the overall health of the workplace. Methodology: A voluntary written survey will be administered to staff in the Adult ICU, CCU and NICU areas. Corley's Moral Distress Survey which measures the intensity and the frequency of moral distress was utilized. Scores have been calculated for the initial survey and the tool will be re-administered in approximately nine to twelve months after a series of presentations, skill building sessions and focus groups are conducted with the staff in these areas. A twelve session program has been designed. Differences in the experiences of staff working with adults versus children/neonates will also be analyzed. Results: Results form the initial survey as well as an outline of intervention steps will be available at the time of the conference date. Implications for practice form the initial survey findings will be outlined and stumbling blocks to implementation will also be identified. [Please contact presenter for more information.] References: Corley, Mary (1995). Moral Distress of critical care nurses. American Journal of Critical Care, 4:280-285 Jameton, A. (1984). Nursing Practice: the Ethical Issues, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, Inc. Thomas, S. (2004). Transforming Nurses' Stress and Anger. New York, NY, Springer Publishing Co. wicks, R. (2006). Overcoming Secondary Stress in Medical and Nursing Practice. New York, NY, Oxford University Press.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:39:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:39:31Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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