2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182782
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Putting the Evidence in Education
Author(s):
Crumpler, Mary; Ross, Amelia
Author Details:
Mary Crumpler, RN, MSN, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: jcrumple@wfubmc.edu; Amelia Ross, RN, MSN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: The evidence on the role of oral care in the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is well documented. Yet nurses continue to perceive oral care as a low priority (Grap et al., 2003; Hixson et al., 1998; Jones et al., 2004; Kite, 1995; McNeill, 2000; Munro and Grap, 2004) comfort measure (Grap et al., 2003; Kite, 1995; Munro and Grap, 2004) and prefer to use foam swabs rather than toothbrushes (Cutler and Davis, 2005; Grap et al., 2003; Jones et al., 2004; Kite, 1995; Sole et al., 2003). Although a best practice oral care protocol for mechanically ventilated patients existed and best practice oral care tools were available, the incidence of VAP in the adult intensive care units had not declined. Clinical nurse specialists postulated that if nurses were able to see the "big picture" or evidence, there would be improvement in the oral care provided; thereby, reducing the incidence of VAP. An evidence-based practice (EBP) educational program was developed to promote the change from task focused to outcome focused care. The EBP education program consisted of a storyboard that reviewed the literature, a competency checklist, and a return demonstration. The nursing staff was offered various learning methodologies including one on one, small group, and online self-education. An oral assessment tool was used to determine the quality of oral care being delivered. Improvements in oral care were demonstrated by a decrease in the median scores on the assessment tool. A statistically significant difference (p=0.0002) was detected in the pre and post education oral assessment scores. Since implementation of the EBP education program, the VAP rates have decreased by 50 percent. References: Cutler C, Davis N. Improving oral care in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. American Journal of Critical Care 2005; 14:5, 389-394. Grap M, Munro C, Ashtiani B, Bryant S. Oral care interventions in critical care: frequency and documentation. American Journal of Critical Care 2003; 12:2, 113-118. Hixson S, Sole M, King T. Nursing strategies to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia. AACN Clinical Issues Advanced Practice in Acute Critical Care 1998; 9:1, 76-90. Jones H, Newton J, Bower E. A survey of the oral care practices of intensive care nurses. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing 2004; 20:69-76. Kite K. Changing mouth care practice in intensive care: implications of the clinical setting context. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing 1995; 11:4, 203-209. McNeill H. Biting back at poor oral hygiene. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing 2000; 16:367-372. Munro C, Grap M. Oral health and care in the intensive care unit: state of the science. American Journal of Critical Care 2004; 13:1, 25-33. Sole M, Byers J, Ludy J, Zhang Y, Banta C, Brummel K. A multisite survey of suctioning techniques and airway management practices. American Journal of Critical Care 2003; 12:3, 220-230.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePutting the Evidence in Educationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrumpler, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Ameliaen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Crumpler, RN, MSN, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: jcrumple@wfubmc.edu; Amelia Ross, RN, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182782-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: The evidence on the role of oral care in the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is well documented. Yet nurses continue to perceive oral care as a low priority (Grap et al., 2003; Hixson et al., 1998; Jones et al., 2004; Kite, 1995; McNeill, 2000; Munro and Grap, 2004) comfort measure (Grap et al., 2003; Kite, 1995; Munro and Grap, 2004) and prefer to use foam swabs rather than toothbrushes (Cutler and Davis, 2005; Grap et al., 2003; Jones et al., 2004; Kite, 1995; Sole et al., 2003). Although a best practice oral care protocol for mechanically ventilated patients existed and best practice oral care tools were available, the incidence of VAP in the adult intensive care units had not declined. Clinical nurse specialists postulated that if nurses were able to see the "big picture" or evidence, there would be improvement in the oral care provided; thereby, reducing the incidence of VAP. An evidence-based practice (EBP) educational program was developed to promote the change from task focused to outcome focused care. The EBP education program consisted of a storyboard that reviewed the literature, a competency checklist, and a return demonstration. The nursing staff was offered various learning methodologies including one on one, small group, and online self-education. An oral assessment tool was used to determine the quality of oral care being delivered. Improvements in oral care were demonstrated by a decrease in the median scores on the assessment tool. A statistically significant difference (p=0.0002) was detected in the pre and post education oral assessment scores. Since implementation of the EBP education program, the VAP rates have decreased by 50 percent. References: Cutler C, Davis N. Improving oral care in patients receiving mechanical ventilation. American Journal of Critical Care 2005; 14:5, 389-394. Grap M, Munro C, Ashtiani B, Bryant S. Oral care interventions in critical care: frequency and documentation. American Journal of Critical Care 2003; 12:2, 113-118. Hixson S, Sole M, King T. Nursing strategies to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia. AACN Clinical Issues Advanced Practice in Acute Critical Care 1998; 9:1, 76-90. Jones H, Newton J, Bower E. A survey of the oral care practices of intensive care nurses. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing 2004; 20:69-76. Kite K. Changing mouth care practice in intensive care: implications of the clinical setting context. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing 1995; 11:4, 203-209. McNeill H. Biting back at poor oral hygiene. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing 2000; 16:367-372. Munro C, Grap M. Oral health and care in the intensive care unit: state of the science. American Journal of Critical Care 2004; 13:1, 25-33. Sole M, Byers J, Ludy J, Zhang Y, Banta C, Brummel K. A multisite survey of suctioning techniques and airway management practices. American Journal of Critical Care 2003; 12:3, 220-230.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:39:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:39:51Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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