2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182787
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Return on Investment: Nurse-determined Priorities for Magnet Organizations
Author(s):
Dennison, Pamela; Rea, Kathleen
Author Details:
Pamela Dennison, MSN, RN, APRN-BC, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: pdd8h@virginia.edu; Kathleen Rea, MSN, RN, APRN-BC
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: Magnet hospitals demonstrate superior responsiveness to nurse feedback in organizational decision making. Retaining a professional nursing staff is a business imperative. A large academic medical center has conducted annual nurse satisfaction surveys using the Nursing Work Index-Revised and the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) Nurse Satisfaction Surveys from 2000 to 2006. Response rates exceed 65%, involving more than 950 nurses annually. The maturity and sophistication of the survey process has propelled organizational outcomes and strategic planning. Descriptive statistical analyses are performed on aggregate and area results as well as demographic and clinical level variables. Survey results are shared with staff nurses, management, and administration. Longitudinal findings evaluate organizational strengths, guide action plans, and provide rationale and momentum for business decisions. In 2002, dissatisfaction with salary fast-tracked a market-based increase for inpatient, procedural and outpatient RNs. In 2005, salary concerns again fueled executive decisions to implement a $3.25 million compensation investment. The Office of Nursing Governance, with a budget of $350,000, was created to standardize practice and facilitate staff nurse participation in shared governance. A creative approach to work teams guided the development of a Post-Anesthesia Care Team at an annual cost of $67, 000. Analysis of staffing patterns and direct care nurses' perceptions of staffing resulted in additional RN and assistive staff positions. Magnet RNs share feedback to generate solutions. Magnet organizations respond to feedback to maintain high nurse satisfaction, generate positive care outcomes and foster optimal practice environments. This is a business model for success. References: Aiken LH, Patrician PA. (2000). Measuring organizational traits of hospitals: The Revised Nursing Work Index. Nursing Research, 49(3), 146-153. Cimiotti, JP, Quinlan, PM, Larson, EL, Pastor, DK, Lin, SX, Stone, PW. (2005). The Magnet process and the perceived work environment of nurses. Nursing Research, 54(6), 384-390. Cummings, GG, Hayduk, L, Estabrooks, CA. (2006). Is the Nursing Work Index measuring up? Nursing Research, 55(2), 82-93. Hayhurst, A, Saylor, C, Stuenkel, D. (2005). Work environmental factors and retention of nurses. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 20(3), 283-288. Taunton, RL. et al. (2004). The NDNQI-adapted index of work satisfaction. Journal of Nursing Measurement, 12(2), 102-122. Ulrich, BT, Buerhaus, PI, Donelan, K, Norman, L, Dittus, R. (2005). How RNs view the work environment: Results of a national survey of Registered Nurses, Journal of Nursing Administration, 35(9), 389-396.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReturn on Investment: Nurse-determined Priorities for Magnet Organizationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDennison, Pamelaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRea, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsPamela Dennison, MSN, RN, APRN-BC, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: pdd8h@virginia.edu; Kathleen Rea, MSN, RN, APRN-BCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182787-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: Magnet hospitals demonstrate superior responsiveness to nurse feedback in organizational decision making. Retaining a professional nursing staff is a business imperative. A large academic medical center has conducted annual nurse satisfaction surveys using the Nursing Work Index-Revised and the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) Nurse Satisfaction Surveys from 2000 to 2006. Response rates exceed 65%, involving more than 950 nurses annually. The maturity and sophistication of the survey process has propelled organizational outcomes and strategic planning. Descriptive statistical analyses are performed on aggregate and area results as well as demographic and clinical level variables. Survey results are shared with staff nurses, management, and administration. Longitudinal findings evaluate organizational strengths, guide action plans, and provide rationale and momentum for business decisions. In 2002, dissatisfaction with salary fast-tracked a market-based increase for inpatient, procedural and outpatient RNs. In 2005, salary concerns again fueled executive decisions to implement a $3.25 million compensation investment. The Office of Nursing Governance, with a budget of $350,000, was created to standardize practice and facilitate staff nurse participation in shared governance. A creative approach to work teams guided the development of a Post-Anesthesia Care Team at an annual cost of $67, 000. Analysis of staffing patterns and direct care nurses' perceptions of staffing resulted in additional RN and assistive staff positions. Magnet RNs share feedback to generate solutions. Magnet organizations respond to feedback to maintain high nurse satisfaction, generate positive care outcomes and foster optimal practice environments. This is a business model for success. References: Aiken LH, Patrician PA. (2000). Measuring organizational traits of hospitals: The Revised Nursing Work Index. Nursing Research, 49(3), 146-153. Cimiotti, JP, Quinlan, PM, Larson, EL, Pastor, DK, Lin, SX, Stone, PW. (2005). The Magnet process and the perceived work environment of nurses. Nursing Research, 54(6), 384-390. Cummings, GG, Hayduk, L, Estabrooks, CA. (2006). Is the Nursing Work Index measuring up? Nursing Research, 55(2), 82-93. Hayhurst, A, Saylor, C, Stuenkel, D. (2005). Work environmental factors and retention of nurses. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 20(3), 283-288. Taunton, RL. et al. (2004). The NDNQI-adapted index of work satisfaction. Journal of Nursing Measurement, 12(2), 102-122. Ulrich, BT, Buerhaus, PI, Donelan, K, Norman, L, Dittus, R. (2005). How RNs view the work environment: Results of a national survey of Registered Nurses, Journal of Nursing Administration, 35(9), 389-396.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:40:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:40:04Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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