2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182799
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Incident Stress Management: Staff Nurses Creating a Culture of Caring and Empowerment
Author(s):
Fisher Brown, Susan; Meyers, Denise
Author Details:
Susan Fisher Brown, RN, AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center, Pomona, New Jersey, USA, email: susan.brown@atlanticare.org; Denise Meyers, RN, BSN, CEN
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: The implementation of a staff-directed Critical Incident Stress Management Team is described in this presentation. Evaluation of team effectiveness suggests that this nurturing process promotes personal and professional healing, allowing participants to transform a painful incident into a reflective growth experience. Nurses experience a number of significant stressors in their daily work lives. Some events may be so distressing they are considered "critical incidents", e.g., death of a child, unexpected patient death, serious medication error, death of a colleague, etc. Critical incidents often evoke normal but powerful physical and/or psychological responses which, if left untreated, may result in burn out, permanent psychological damage, Critical Incident Stress Disorder (CISD), or suicide. It is crucial that healthcare organizations implement strategies to minimize Critical Incident Stress. One such strategy is known as "Critical Incident Stress Management" - "a comprehensive integrated, multi-component continuum approach to crisis intervention". (Everly and Mitchell 2003). One intervention level particularly suited to healthcare is that of peer support or defusing, which can be accomplished by a qualified peer. Through this intervention members may improve quality of care, heighten interdisciplinary relationships, and increase staff retention. Nursing management initially supported this staff initiated process through financial assistance for training and subsequently by providing for a self governed, safe, private, and confidential forum. Participants are able to transition the experience from the forefront of their practice into their memories for future reflection. We will demonstrate how staff nurses in the Emergency Department implemented a CISM Team, share several experiences that led to expansion of this process across the organization, and provide information about becoming credentialed in CISM. References: Mitchell, J.T., Everly Jr., G.S., (1997). Critical Incident Stress Debriefing: An Operations Manual for CISD, Defusing and Other Group Crisis Intervention Services, 3d ed, Ellicott City, Maryland: Chevron Publishing Corporation. Everly Jr., G.S., Mitchell, J.T., (2003). Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Individual Crisis Intervention and Support, 2d ed, Ellicott City, Maryland: International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc. Internet viewed February 15, 2007 http://www.icisf.org
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Incident Stress Management: Staff Nurses Creating a Culture of Caring and Empowermenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorFisher Brown, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeyers, Deniseen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Fisher Brown, RN, AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center, Pomona, New Jersey, USA, email: susan.brown@atlanticare.org; Denise Meyers, RN, BSN, CENen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182799-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: The implementation of a staff-directed Critical Incident Stress Management Team is described in this presentation. Evaluation of team effectiveness suggests that this nurturing process promotes personal and professional healing, allowing participants to transform a painful incident into a reflective growth experience. Nurses experience a number of significant stressors in their daily work lives. Some events may be so distressing they are considered "critical incidents", e.g., death of a child, unexpected patient death, serious medication error, death of a colleague, etc. Critical incidents often evoke normal but powerful physical and/or psychological responses which, if left untreated, may result in burn out, permanent psychological damage, Critical Incident Stress Disorder (CISD), or suicide. It is crucial that healthcare organizations implement strategies to minimize Critical Incident Stress. One such strategy is known as "Critical Incident Stress Management" - "a comprehensive integrated, multi-component continuum approach to crisis intervention". (Everly and Mitchell 2003). One intervention level particularly suited to healthcare is that of peer support or defusing, which can be accomplished by a qualified peer. Through this intervention members may improve quality of care, heighten interdisciplinary relationships, and increase staff retention. Nursing management initially supported this staff initiated process through financial assistance for training and subsequently by providing for a self governed, safe, private, and confidential forum. Participants are able to transition the experience from the forefront of their practice into their memories for future reflection. We will demonstrate how staff nurses in the Emergency Department implemented a CISM Team, share several experiences that led to expansion of this process across the organization, and provide information about becoming credentialed in CISM. References: Mitchell, J.T., Everly Jr., G.S., (1997). Critical Incident Stress Debriefing: An Operations Manual for CISD, Defusing and Other Group Crisis Intervention Services, 3d ed, Ellicott City, Maryland: Chevron Publishing Corporation. Everly Jr., G.S., Mitchell, J.T., (2003). Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM): Individual Crisis Intervention and Support, 2d ed, Ellicott City, Maryland: International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc. Internet viewed February 15, 2007 http://www.icisf.orgen_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:40:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:40:35Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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