2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182810
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse/Physician Collaboration: An Appreciative Inquiry
Author(s):
Glessner, Theresa; Gardner, Kathryn
Author Details:
Theresa Glessner, RN, MSN, NP, BC, CCRN, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, New York, USA, email: theresa.glessner@viahealth.org; Kathryn Gardner, RN, EdD
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: Effective nurse-physician collaboration has been shown to improve patient safety through better communication. Additionally, it has been shown to as well as improve quality of care, and both patient and nurse satisfaction. After IRB approval and consent were obtained, an appreciative inquiry was conducted to identify stories of nurses and physicians about successful collaborative experiences. Sixty-four stories were collected from thirty four nurses and thirty physicians. The stories centered on collaborative experiences in critical care and medical surgical areas. Qualitative analysis of these stories was undertaken to identify common themes surrounding (1) triggers for collaboration, (2) understanding the care providers' perception of successful collaboration and (3) outcomes of the collaboration. The results indicate that successful collaboration is initiated when either care provider feels vulnerable due to patient crisis, inexperience of the provider or fear of failure. Outcomes of collaboration include: empowerment, increased satisfaction, respect and trust for the other collaborator, and perception of improved quality and efficiency of care. Three levels or stages of successful collaboration were identified with the highest level being an interactive partnership between providers where both partners consider the other person's professional practice experience. Results of this analysis indicate that interdisciplinary collaboration is based on interpersonal skills, trust, and an intense need to work together to achieve a common goal which centers around a positive outcome for the patient.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse/Physician Collaboration: An Appreciative Inquiryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGlessner, Theresaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGardner, Kathrynen_US
dc.author.detailsTheresa Glessner, RN, MSN, NP, BC, CCRN, Rochester General Hospital, Rochester, New York, USA, email: theresa.glessner@viahealth.org; Kathryn Gardner, RN, EdDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182810-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: Effective nurse-physician collaboration has been shown to improve patient safety through better communication. Additionally, it has been shown to as well as improve quality of care, and both patient and nurse satisfaction. After IRB approval and consent were obtained, an appreciative inquiry was conducted to identify stories of nurses and physicians about successful collaborative experiences. Sixty-four stories were collected from thirty four nurses and thirty physicians. The stories centered on collaborative experiences in critical care and medical surgical areas. Qualitative analysis of these stories was undertaken to identify common themes surrounding (1) triggers for collaboration, (2) understanding the care providers' perception of successful collaboration and (3) outcomes of the collaboration. The results indicate that successful collaboration is initiated when either care provider feels vulnerable due to patient crisis, inexperience of the provider or fear of failure. Outcomes of collaboration include: empowerment, increased satisfaction, respect and trust for the other collaborator, and perception of improved quality and efficiency of care. Three levels or stages of successful collaboration were identified with the highest level being an interactive partnership between providers where both partners consider the other person's professional practice experience. Results of this analysis indicate that interdisciplinary collaboration is based on interpersonal skills, trust, and an intense need to work together to achieve a common goal which centers around a positive outcome for the patient.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:41:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:41:04Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.