2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182817
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sprains, Strains and Claims: How to Provide Safe Patient Handling
Author(s):
Haack, Wanda
Author Details:
Wanda Haack, BSN, RN, CRRN, Genesis Medical Center, Davenport, Iowa, USA, email: haack@genesishealth.com
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: Safe patient handling is a concern for all patients and staff. The American Nurses Association (2003) and the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses (2006) have developed position papers encouraging all of nursing to address this issue. In an effort to address safe patient handling, a policy on safe lifting techniques was written. Due to the high volume of sprains, strains and claims on the Rehabilitation unit, the employee health nurses and administration supported a pilot project outlined by the nurse manager and the ergonomics committee focusing on efforts to reduce employee injuries. The pilot allowed for the purchase of equipment such as standing lifts, hydraulic shower chairs, ceiling lifts and positioning aides. Beds were replaced to ensure the ability to lower the bed to height needed and to include the option for weighing patients. Video taped back safety and transfer education was modified to provide hands-on education with a physical therapist during initial staff orientation. Competencies for equipment use utilized and champions for equipment training were identified. Communication of individual patients transfer methods is done through report and room boards. There has not been a claim since January 2005, reducing our costs significantly. Rehabilitation is no longer on the top ten list for employee injuries. Staff has verbalized formally and informally their satisfaction with the safe patient handling project. The project has been implemented on five other units in the hospital. References: APTA. (2005). Improving Patient and HealthCare Provider Safety. PT Magazine, 48-52. Castro, A. B. d., Hagan, P., & Nelson, A. (2006). Prioritizing Safe Patient Handling. JONA, 36(7/8), 363-369. Hartvigsen, J., Lauritzen, S., Lings, S., & Lauritzen, T. (2005). Intensive Education Combined With Low Tech Ergonomic Intervention Does not Prevent Low Back Pain in Nurses. Occupational Environmental Medicine(62), 13-17. Li, J., Wolf, L., & Evanoff, B. (2004). Use of Mechanical Patient Lifts Decreased Musculoskeletal Symptoms and Injuries Among Health Care Workers. Injury Prevention, 10, 212-216. Nathenson, P. (127). Adapting OSHA Ergonomic Guidelines to the Rehabilitation Setting. Rehabilitation Nursing, 29(4), 127-130. Nelson, A. (2003). Using Simulation to Design and Integrate Technology for Safety and More Efficient Practice Environments. Nursing Outlook(51), 27-29. Nelson, A. (2004). Evidence-Based Practices for Safe Patient Handling and Movement. On-Line Journal of Issues in Nursing, 9(3), 118-141. Ronald, L., Yassi, A., Spiegel, J., Tate, R., Tait, D., & Mozel, M. (2002). Effectiveness of Installing Overhead Ceiling Lifts. AAOHN, 50(3), 120-127.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSprains, Strains and Claims: How to Provide Safe Patient Handlingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHaack, Wandaen_US
dc.author.detailsWanda Haack, BSN, RN, CRRN, Genesis Medical Center, Davenport, Iowa, USA, email: haack@genesishealth.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182817-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: Safe patient handling is a concern for all patients and staff. The American Nurses Association (2003) and the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses (2006) have developed position papers encouraging all of nursing to address this issue. In an effort to address safe patient handling, a policy on safe lifting techniques was written. Due to the high volume of sprains, strains and claims on the Rehabilitation unit, the employee health nurses and administration supported a pilot project outlined by the nurse manager and the ergonomics committee focusing on efforts to reduce employee injuries. The pilot allowed for the purchase of equipment such as standing lifts, hydraulic shower chairs, ceiling lifts and positioning aides. Beds were replaced to ensure the ability to lower the bed to height needed and to include the option for weighing patients. Video taped back safety and transfer education was modified to provide hands-on education with a physical therapist during initial staff orientation. Competencies for equipment use utilized and champions for equipment training were identified. Communication of individual patients transfer methods is done through report and room boards. There has not been a claim since January 2005, reducing our costs significantly. Rehabilitation is no longer on the top ten list for employee injuries. Staff has verbalized formally and informally their satisfaction with the safe patient handling project. The project has been implemented on five other units in the hospital. References: APTA. (2005). Improving Patient and HealthCare Provider Safety. PT Magazine, 48-52. Castro, A. B. d., Hagan, P., & Nelson, A. (2006). Prioritizing Safe Patient Handling. JONA, 36(7/8), 363-369. Hartvigsen, J., Lauritzen, S., Lings, S., & Lauritzen, T. (2005). Intensive Education Combined With Low Tech Ergonomic Intervention Does not Prevent Low Back Pain in Nurses. Occupational Environmental Medicine(62), 13-17. Li, J., Wolf, L., & Evanoff, B. (2004). Use of Mechanical Patient Lifts Decreased Musculoskeletal Symptoms and Injuries Among Health Care Workers. Injury Prevention, 10, 212-216. Nathenson, P. (127). Adapting OSHA Ergonomic Guidelines to the Rehabilitation Setting. Rehabilitation Nursing, 29(4), 127-130. Nelson, A. (2003). Using Simulation to Design and Integrate Technology for Safety and More Efficient Practice Environments. Nursing Outlook(51), 27-29. Nelson, A. (2004). Evidence-Based Practices for Safe Patient Handling and Movement. On-Line Journal of Issues in Nursing, 9(3), 118-141. Ronald, L., Yassi, A., Spiegel, J., Tate, R., Tait, D., & Mozel, M. (2002). Effectiveness of Installing Overhead Ceiling Lifts. AAOHN, 50(3), 120-127.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:41:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:41:24Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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