2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182827
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Change in a New Zealand Institution During Application for Magnet Recognition
Author(s):
Holzhauser, Kerri
Author Details:
Kerri Holzhauser, B.HealthSc. (Nursing), Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia, email: kerri_holzhauser@health.qld.gov.au
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Background: Magnet hospitals undertake a rigorous designation process to receive the prestigious award. Nursing services in these hospitals share common characteristics: supportive management styles, qualified nurse leaders, decentralised organisational structure, good staffing, flexible work schedules, autonomy and control over practice, availability of clinical expertise and support for orientation and professional development (1). Little research has been undertaken to examine nursing workplace culture change during the designation process that can take up to three years. Aim: This paper presents results of research that examines the change one organisation undergoes during it?s application for Magnet Recognition. The discussion includes changes to organisational traits such as job satisfaction, professional practice environment and burnout. Methodology: A mixed method approach was devised using a survey tool to examine organisational traits and interviews and focus groups to explore changes at unit and divisional level. Reference: 1. McClure, ML, Poulin, MA, Sovie, MD & Wandelt, MA 1983, Magnet hospitals : attraction and retention of professional nurses, American Nurses' Association, Kansas City, Mo.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Change in a New Zealand Institution During Application for Magnet Recognitionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHolzhauser, Kerrien_US
dc.author.detailsKerri Holzhauser, B.HealthSc. (Nursing), Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia, email: kerri_holzhauser@health.qld.gov.auen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182827-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Background: Magnet hospitals undertake a rigorous designation process to receive the prestigious award. Nursing services in these hospitals share common characteristics: supportive management styles, qualified nurse leaders, decentralised organisational structure, good staffing, flexible work schedules, autonomy and control over practice, availability of clinical expertise and support for orientation and professional development (1). Little research has been undertaken to examine nursing workplace culture change during the designation process that can take up to three years. Aim: This paper presents results of research that examines the change one organisation undergoes during it?s application for Magnet Recognition. The discussion includes changes to organisational traits such as job satisfaction, professional practice environment and burnout. Methodology: A mixed method approach was devised using a survey tool to examine organisational traits and interviews and focus groups to explore changes at unit and divisional level. Reference: 1. McClure, ML, Poulin, MA, Sovie, MD & Wandelt, MA 1983, Magnet hospitals : attraction and retention of professional nurses, American Nurses' Association, Kansas City, Mo.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:41:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:41:51Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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