2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182834
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fluid Delivery for Response to Pediatric Shock
Author(s):
Jurecky, Gabrielle; Lluria, Kristine
Author Details:
Gabrielle Jurecky, RN, BSN, University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: gjurecky@umcaz.edu; Kristine Lluria, RN, BSN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Pediatric patients with cancer account for a disproportionately large percentage of patients with severe sepsis (Tamburro, 2005). The ability to reverse shock requires aggressive fluid resuscitation (Han, et al, 2003). Four methods to rapidly infuse large volumes of fluid were identified through a literature review and review of existing practice. These methods could deliver the fluid bolus at different rates. This study was designed to determine which method of fluid resuscitation most quickly rehydrates pediatric patients. The four methods were tested by measuring the amount of fluid that could be delivered over five minutes. The testing clearly identified the effectiveness of each method. The results guide the practitioner in deciding on the most appropriate method for the given patient assessment. A secondary outcome of this study was the development of Shock/Rapid Response Box containing the needed supplies for all methods. The availability of this box could dramatically reduce the response time to a shock event. References: Egland, A.G. & Egland, T. (March 23, 2006). Pediatrics, dehydration. Emedicine from Web MD. Han, Y.Y., Carcillo, J.A., Dragotta, M.A., Bills, D.M., Watson, R.S., Westerman, M.E., Orr, R.A. (October, 2003). Early reversal of pediatric-neonatal septic shock by community physicians is associated with improved outcome. Pediatrics. 112,4:793-799. Khilnani, P. (2005). Clinical management guidelines of pediatric septic shock. Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine, 9, 164-172. Schwarz, A. (March 30, 2006). Shock. Emedicine from Web MD. Tamburro, R. (2005). Pediatric cancer patients in clinical trials of sepsis: Factors that predispose to sepsis and stratify outcomes. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. 6,(3supplement), S87-S91.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFluid Delivery for Response to Pediatric Shocken_GB
dc.contributor.authorJurecky, Gabrielleen_US
dc.contributor.authorLluria, Kristineen_US
dc.author.detailsGabrielle Jurecky, RN, BSN, University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona, USA, email: gjurecky@umcaz.edu; Kristine Lluria, RN, BSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182834-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Pediatric patients with cancer account for a disproportionately large percentage of patients with severe sepsis (Tamburro, 2005). The ability to reverse shock requires aggressive fluid resuscitation (Han, et al, 2003). Four methods to rapidly infuse large volumes of fluid were identified through a literature review and review of existing practice. These methods could deliver the fluid bolus at different rates. This study was designed to determine which method of fluid resuscitation most quickly rehydrates pediatric patients. The four methods were tested by measuring the amount of fluid that could be delivered over five minutes. The testing clearly identified the effectiveness of each method. The results guide the practitioner in deciding on the most appropriate method for the given patient assessment. A secondary outcome of this study was the development of Shock/Rapid Response Box containing the needed supplies for all methods. The availability of this box could dramatically reduce the response time to a shock event. References: Egland, A.G. & Egland, T. (March 23, 2006). Pediatrics, dehydration. Emedicine from Web MD. Han, Y.Y., Carcillo, J.A., Dragotta, M.A., Bills, D.M., Watson, R.S., Westerman, M.E., Orr, R.A. (October, 2003). Early reversal of pediatric-neonatal septic shock by community physicians is associated with improved outcome. Pediatrics. 112,4:793-799. Khilnani, P. (2005). Clinical management guidelines of pediatric septic shock. Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine, 9, 164-172. Schwarz, A. (March 30, 2006). Shock. Emedicine from Web MD. Tamburro, R. (2005). Pediatric cancer patients in clinical trials of sepsis: Factors that predispose to sepsis and stratify outcomes. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. 6,(3supplement), S87-S91.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:42:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:42:10Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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