2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182846
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Best Practices in Collaborative Governance: What are the Outcomes?
Author(s):
Lee, Susan; Pittman, Taryn
Author Details:
Susan Lee, PhD, APRN-BC, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: slee40@partners.org; Taryn Pittman, RN, MS
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: Collaborative governance, designed to optimize staff participation in organizational decision-making, is a program that provides strong evidence for Force 2, yet little work has been done to evaluate its outcomes. In an era that demands evidence-based practices, this presentation will use an actual case study to demonstrate best practices in collaborative governance and will describe a range of ways to demonstrate outcomes. A longitudinal, mixed methods study that measured empowerment among collaborative governance members and their counterparts (N=1112) at baseline and at four subsequent periods, benchmarked the personal impact of collaborative governance over a ten-year period. The theoretical framework was an evidence-based management theory, Kanter's Theory of Structural Power in Organizations, using the Conditions for Work Effectiveness Scale, Job Activity Scale, Organizational Relationships Scale and the Psychological Empowerment Scale. To demonstrate other outcomes of collaborative governance, simpler strategies were effectively used such as 1) annual reports, enhanced through content analysis, and 2) network analysis to determine the connectivity of collaborative governance committees with other entities in the hospital over time. Quantitative data suggested that collaborative governance members were significantly more empowered. Qualitative data described the experience of collaborative governance as, "enjoying the work," "being part of the group," "making a difference," "connecting with the hospital," "taking on new challenges" and "transforming me." The annual reports documented the work of the committees; content analysis demonstrated that the work of the committees was aligned with their charges. Network analysis demonstrated increasing connectivity. Identifying collaborative governance outcomes requires multiple methods. References: American Nurse Credentialing Center (ANCC). Forces of magnetism. Retrieved February 22, 2007 from http://www.nursecredentialing.org/magnet/forces.html. Ives Erickson, J., Hamilton, G.A., Jones, D.E., & Ditomassi, M. (2003). The value of collaborative governance/staff empowerment. Journal of Nursing Administration, 33(2), 96-104. Laschinger, H.K.S., Sabiston, J.A., & Kutszcher, L. (1997). Empowerment and staff nurse decision involvement in nursing work environments: Testing Kanter?s Theory of Structural Power in Organizations. Research in Nursing & Health, 20, 341-352. Melnyck, B.M. & Fineout-Overholt, E. (Eds.) (2005). Evidence-based practice in nursing and healthcare: A guide to best practice. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Porter-O?Grady, T., Hawkins, M.A., & Parker, M.L. (1997). Whole-systems shared governance: Architecture for integration. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen. Spreitzer, G.M., Kizilos, M. & Nason, S. (1997). A dimensional analysis of the relationship between psychological empowerment and effectiveness, satisfaction, and strain. Journal of Management, 23(5), 679-704. Sverke, M., Hellgren, J., & Näswall, K. (Eds.) (2007). The Individual in the Changing Working Life. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBest Practices in Collaborative Governance: What are the Outcomes?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLee, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorPittman, Tarynen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan Lee, PhD, APRN-BC, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: slee40@partners.org; Taryn Pittman, RN, MSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182846-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: Collaborative governance, designed to optimize staff participation in organizational decision-making, is a program that provides strong evidence for Force 2, yet little work has been done to evaluate its outcomes. In an era that demands evidence-based practices, this presentation will use an actual case study to demonstrate best practices in collaborative governance and will describe a range of ways to demonstrate outcomes. A longitudinal, mixed methods study that measured empowerment among collaborative governance members and their counterparts (N=1112) at baseline and at four subsequent periods, benchmarked the personal impact of collaborative governance over a ten-year period. The theoretical framework was an evidence-based management theory, Kanter's Theory of Structural Power in Organizations, using the Conditions for Work Effectiveness Scale, Job Activity Scale, Organizational Relationships Scale and the Psychological Empowerment Scale. To demonstrate other outcomes of collaborative governance, simpler strategies were effectively used such as 1) annual reports, enhanced through content analysis, and 2) network analysis to determine the connectivity of collaborative governance committees with other entities in the hospital over time. Quantitative data suggested that collaborative governance members were significantly more empowered. Qualitative data described the experience of collaborative governance as, "enjoying the work," "being part of the group," "making a difference," "connecting with the hospital," "taking on new challenges" and "transforming me." The annual reports documented the work of the committees; content analysis demonstrated that the work of the committees was aligned with their charges. Network analysis demonstrated increasing connectivity. Identifying collaborative governance outcomes requires multiple methods. References: American Nurse Credentialing Center (ANCC). Forces of magnetism. Retrieved February 22, 2007 from http://www.nursecredentialing.org/magnet/forces.html. Ives Erickson, J., Hamilton, G.A., Jones, D.E., & Ditomassi, M. (2003). The value of collaborative governance/staff empowerment. Journal of Nursing Administration, 33(2), 96-104. Laschinger, H.K.S., Sabiston, J.A., & Kutszcher, L. (1997). Empowerment and staff nurse decision involvement in nursing work environments: Testing Kanter?s Theory of Structural Power in Organizations. Research in Nursing & Health, 20, 341-352. Melnyck, B.M. & Fineout-Overholt, E. (Eds.) (2005). Evidence-based practice in nursing and healthcare: A guide to best practice. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Porter-O?Grady, T., Hawkins, M.A., & Parker, M.L. (1997). Whole-systems shared governance: Architecture for integration. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen. Spreitzer, G.M., Kizilos, M. & Nason, S. (1997). A dimensional analysis of the relationship between psychological empowerment and effectiveness, satisfaction, and strain. Journal of Management, 23(5), 679-704. Sverke, M., Hellgren, J., & Näswall, K. (Eds.) (2007). The Individual in the Changing Working Life. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:42:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:42:44Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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