The Impact of Nurse-Driven Protocols to Reduce Nosocomial Infections in the Cardio-Thoracic Surgical Population

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182847
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Nurse-Driven Protocols to Reduce Nosocomial Infections in the Cardio-Thoracic Surgical Population
Author(s):
Leger, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Leger, RN, BSN, CCRN, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: Dleger@lifespan.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Nosocomial infection is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality that contributes to increased length of stay in cardiovascular thoracic surgical intensive care units (CVT-SICUs). Prevention of nosocomial infections in CVT-SICU may be positively influenced by evidence-based, nurse-driven protocols and practices. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the impact of evidence-based, nurse-driven protocols on the occurrence of three high-risk, high-profile nosocomial infections occurring in ICUs. Protocols to prevent and/or reduce catheter-related blood stream infection (CR-BSI), surgical site infection (SSI), and ventilator-acquired pneumonia (VAP) were developed by the author in conjunction with the unit-based Quality Improvement Committee and the Nursing Department?s Evidence Based Best Practice Council. The target population consisted of patients with varying co-morbidities undergoing various cardio-thoracic surgeries and receiving post-operative care in the CVT-SICU. Data for each indicator were collected retrospectively over three distinct time periods. Three months pre and post CR-BSI and SSI data were collected; data for VAP were collected over a six-month pre and post time period. No significant changes in surgical or nursing techniques occurred during the data collection period. Nurse-driven protocols reduced nosocomial infections in all three-target areas: CR-BSI from 5.9% to 0%; SSI from 3.7% to 0%; VAP from 13.5% to 10.2%. These results suggest that evidence-based, nurse-driven protocols can be highly effective in reducing the occurrence of these nosocomial infections in the cardio-thoracic surgery population. References: Coopersmith, C., Rebmann, T., Zack, J., Ward, M., Corcoran, R., and Schallom, M. (2002). Effects of an educational program on decreasing catheter-related bloodstream infections in the surgical intensive care unit. Critical Care Medicine, 30(1), 59-64. Deriso, A., Ladowski, J., Dillion, J., and Peterson, A. (1996). Chlorhexidine gluconate 0.12% oral rinse reduces the incidence of total nosocomial respiratory infection and nonprophylactic systemic antibiotic use in patients undergoing heart surgery. Chest. 109, 1556-1561. Tablan, O., Alexander, m., Dellinger, E., Gerberding, J., Heard, S., et. al. (2003). Guidelines for preventing health-care associated pneumonia. CDC Recommendations and Reports. 53(3), 1-80. Vernon, M., Hatden, M., Trick, W., Hayes, R., Blom, D. and Weinstein, R. (2006). Chlorhexidine gluconate to cleanse patients in a medical intensive care unit: The effectiveness of source control to reduce the bioburden of VRE. Archives of Internal Medicine. 166(3), 306-312.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Nurse-Driven Protocols to Reduce Nosocomial Infections in the Cardio-Thoracic Surgical Populationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLeger, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Leger, RN, BSN, CCRN, The Miriam Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: Dleger@lifespan.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182847-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Nosocomial infection is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality that contributes to increased length of stay in cardiovascular thoracic surgical intensive care units (CVT-SICUs). Prevention of nosocomial infections in CVT-SICU may be positively influenced by evidence-based, nurse-driven protocols and practices. The purpose of this project was to evaluate the impact of evidence-based, nurse-driven protocols on the occurrence of three high-risk, high-profile nosocomial infections occurring in ICUs. Protocols to prevent and/or reduce catheter-related blood stream infection (CR-BSI), surgical site infection (SSI), and ventilator-acquired pneumonia (VAP) were developed by the author in conjunction with the unit-based Quality Improvement Committee and the Nursing Department?s Evidence Based Best Practice Council. The target population consisted of patients with varying co-morbidities undergoing various cardio-thoracic surgeries and receiving post-operative care in the CVT-SICU. Data for each indicator were collected retrospectively over three distinct time periods. Three months pre and post CR-BSI and SSI data were collected; data for VAP were collected over a six-month pre and post time period. No significant changes in surgical or nursing techniques occurred during the data collection period. Nurse-driven protocols reduced nosocomial infections in all three-target areas: CR-BSI from 5.9% to 0%; SSI from 3.7% to 0%; VAP from 13.5% to 10.2%. These results suggest that evidence-based, nurse-driven protocols can be highly effective in reducing the occurrence of these nosocomial infections in the cardio-thoracic surgery population. References: Coopersmith, C., Rebmann, T., Zack, J., Ward, M., Corcoran, R., and Schallom, M. (2002). Effects of an educational program on decreasing catheter-related bloodstream infections in the surgical intensive care unit. Critical Care Medicine, 30(1), 59-64. Deriso, A., Ladowski, J., Dillion, J., and Peterson, A. (1996). Chlorhexidine gluconate 0.12% oral rinse reduces the incidence of total nosocomial respiratory infection and nonprophylactic systemic antibiotic use in patients undergoing heart surgery. Chest. 109, 1556-1561. Tablan, O., Alexander, m., Dellinger, E., Gerberding, J., Heard, S., et. al. (2003). Guidelines for preventing health-care associated pneumonia. CDC Recommendations and Reports. 53(3), 1-80. Vernon, M., Hatden, M., Trick, W., Hayes, R., Blom, D. and Weinstein, R. (2006). Chlorhexidine gluconate to cleanse patients in a medical intensive care unit: The effectiveness of source control to reduce the bioburden of VRE. Archives of Internal Medicine. 166(3), 306-312.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:42:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:42:47Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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