2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182854
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quiet Time: Needed or Not on a Progressive Care Unit?
Author(s):
Lynn, Deroma; Pilz, Marie
Author Details:
Deroma Lynn, ADN, RN, PCCN, St. Joseph's/Candler, Midway, Georgia, USA, email: deroma@clds.net; Marie Pilz, MSN, RN, CCNS
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: The purpose of this research was to decrease patient fatigue (increase patient satisfaction) through implementation of a quiet time for the Progressive Care Unit (PCU) patients. The theoretical framework was based on Florence Nightingale's basic tenets. Nightingale believed that nurses should create the best possible environment for their patients to preserve and restore health and prevent or cure disease. Research has shown that adequate sleep is essential to the healing process -to restore and maintain physiologic and mental health. Technology, people and equipment contribute to noise pollution on the unit. The patients are not able to get a good night?s rest due the noises heard throughout the night and then the staff wake them up early for laboratory tests and to take vital signs. A staff nurse wondered if patients needed a Quiet Time (Force 5). The Quiet Time would give them a period of time to rest with the lights turned down and reduced noise in the unit. This quantitative research study consisted of a pre-test and post-test format. Letters were sent to ancillary departments and physicians that see patients on PCU informing them of this study asking for their support and cooperation. We had consultations with the local university nursing faculty for tool selection and statistical assistance (Force 8). Staff on PCU were educated on the importance of rest (Force 6). Preliminary data shows that patients and staff enjoyed the Quiet Time and felt it was beneficial.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuiet Time: Needed or Not on a Progressive Care Unit?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLynn, Deromaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPilz, Marieen_US
dc.author.detailsDeroma Lynn, ADN, RN, PCCN, St. Joseph's/Candler, Midway, Georgia, USA, email: deroma@clds.net; Marie Pilz, MSN, RN, CCNSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182854-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: The purpose of this research was to decrease patient fatigue (increase patient satisfaction) through implementation of a quiet time for the Progressive Care Unit (PCU) patients. The theoretical framework was based on Florence Nightingale's basic tenets. Nightingale believed that nurses should create the best possible environment for their patients to preserve and restore health and prevent or cure disease. Research has shown that adequate sleep is essential to the healing process -to restore and maintain physiologic and mental health. Technology, people and equipment contribute to noise pollution on the unit. The patients are not able to get a good night?s rest due the noises heard throughout the night and then the staff wake them up early for laboratory tests and to take vital signs. A staff nurse wondered if patients needed a Quiet Time (Force 5). The Quiet Time would give them a period of time to rest with the lights turned down and reduced noise in the unit. This quantitative research study consisted of a pre-test and post-test format. Letters were sent to ancillary departments and physicians that see patients on PCU informing them of this study asking for their support and cooperation. We had consultations with the local university nursing faculty for tool selection and statistical assistance (Force 8). Staff on PCU were educated on the importance of rest (Force 6). Preliminary data shows that patients and staff enjoyed the Quiet Time and felt it was beneficial.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:43:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:43:06Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.