2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182857
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Everyday Heroes: Rapid Response Team, Search and Rescue!
Author(s):
Maiorana, Stella; Moorhead, Carolyn
Author Details:
Stella Maiorana, RN, MSN, CNP, Humility of Mary Health Partners: Saint Elizabeth Health Center, Youngstown, Ohio, USA, email: stella_maiorana@hmis.org; Carolyn Moorhead, RN, BSN, CCRN
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: Implementation of a Rapid Response Team (RRT) supports the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) 100,000 Lives Campaign. This initiative was perhaps the most dramatic of the six IHI strategies aimed at reducing the amount of unintended deaths. This was based on research findings that patients often exhibit identifiable signs and symptoms of instability hours prior to their cardiac event. Adverse cardiac events are a common and serious complication among hospitalized patients. The development of an RRT on February 17, 2005, at a non-profit acute care teaching hospital supports Force 6: Quality of Care, by providing a culture of safety through rapid interventions when patient conditions deteriorate in the non-ICU setting. The team provides, within minutes, an interdisciplinary medical team approach (Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) or Critical Care Nurse (CCN), Respiratory Therapist (RT), and a Medical Resident Post-Graduate Year (PGY) III) to collaboratively assess and treat an adult patient with an acute change in condition that is not identified as a Do Not Resuscitate Comfort Care (DNRCC). The RRT has allowed early interventions in rescuing our patient's verses resuscitating them. Comparative statistics of 2005 vs 2006 reflects a decrease in patient mortalities of 5.3 per month. The literature supports the enhanced quality of care and decreased mortality rates in hospitals utilizing similar teams. Physicians, staff, patients and families who have had the privilege of experiencing this team support, have expressed satisfaction with the results. Reference: www.ihi.org
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEveryday Heroes: Rapid Response Team, Search and Rescue!en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaiorana, Stellaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoorhead, Carolynen_US
dc.author.detailsStella Maiorana, RN, MSN, CNP, Humility of Mary Health Partners: Saint Elizabeth Health Center, Youngstown, Ohio, USA, email: stella_maiorana@hmis.org; Carolyn Moorhead, RN, BSN, CCRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182857-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: Implementation of a Rapid Response Team (RRT) supports the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) 100,000 Lives Campaign. This initiative was perhaps the most dramatic of the six IHI strategies aimed at reducing the amount of unintended deaths. This was based on research findings that patients often exhibit identifiable signs and symptoms of instability hours prior to their cardiac event. Adverse cardiac events are a common and serious complication among hospitalized patients. The development of an RRT on February 17, 2005, at a non-profit acute care teaching hospital supports Force 6: Quality of Care, by providing a culture of safety through rapid interventions when patient conditions deteriorate in the non-ICU setting. The team provides, within minutes, an interdisciplinary medical team approach (Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) or Critical Care Nurse (CCN), Respiratory Therapist (RT), and a Medical Resident Post-Graduate Year (PGY) III) to collaboratively assess and treat an adult patient with an acute change in condition that is not identified as a Do Not Resuscitate Comfort Care (DNRCC). The RRT has allowed early interventions in rescuing our patient's verses resuscitating them. Comparative statistics of 2005 vs 2006 reflects a decrease in patient mortalities of 5.3 per month. The literature supports the enhanced quality of care and decreased mortality rates in hospitals utilizing similar teams. Physicians, staff, patients and families who have had the privilege of experiencing this team support, have expressed satisfaction with the results. Reference: www.ihi.orgen_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:43:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:43:14Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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