2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182866
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Throughput: Technology Enabled Process Improvement
Author(s):
Montgomery, Meryl; Pillai, Deepak
Author Details:
Meryl Montgomery, RN, MSN, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Macon, Georgia, USA, email: montgomery.meryl@mccg.org; Deepak Pillai, MD, MBA, GE Healthcare Technologies
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: In an environment of high patient and physician demand for beds, a 600 bed teaching hospital in the Southeast expanded previous nursing PI projects to address opportunities for improvement in patient turnaround time, satisfaction, admissions and other metrics. Numerous national benchmarking and standard setting entities such as Joint Commission, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, American Hospital Association, The Advisory Board, among others, have clearly identified improved patient throughput as a national imperative. Utilizing qualitative research, Lean Six Sigma and Change Acceleration Processes, a combination of process improvement, RFID (radiofrequency) technology and an electronic patient care visibility display system was implemented to expand capacity and create a more efficient care environment. The new visibility and patient tracking system is networked across the hospital and allows rapid identification of available patient rooms and a synthesized single view of patient status. Together with workflow redesign, patient throughput challenges were addressed with both technology and process changes. The identification and monitoring of both high level and unit specific metrics has expanded nursing's understanding of the impact of nursing care practices. Initiating and sustaining the cultural change from "push" to "pull" has involved engagement, education, research, interdisciplinary involvement, administrative and front line commitment, a strong reward and recognition infrastructure, as well as communication and feedback regarding metrics. Demonstrated outcomes include earlier discharges, a left shift in discharge and admission practices to earlier in the day, improved inter-unit relationships, increased admissions, decreased delays in admission from ED and PACU, and increased patient and nurse satisfaction. References: Clark, Jonathan J. Unlocking hospital gridlock. hfm Nov. 2005 (pp 1-6). Patient flow survey, focus group and interview results- July 2005- November 2006 Medical Center of Central Georgia. Erdley, WS. Concept development of nursing information. CIN. March/April 2005: 93-99 Haraden, C. et al. Optimizing Patient Flow. Institute for Healthcare Improvement. 2003 white paper. Hawkins, DT. Information Visualization: Don't Tell Me, Show Me! www.onlineinc.com/onlinemag. Jan/Feb 1999;23,1; ABI/INFORM Global:88-90. Health Care Advisory Board. Maximizing Hospital Capacity: Expediting Patient Throughput in an Era of Shortage. Washington, D.C.: The Advisory Board (2002) Mahaffey, Samuel. Optimizing patient flow in the enterprise. Health Management Technology. August 2004; 25, 8: ABI/INFORM Global: 34-36. Parker, P. Technology alleviates bed management woes. Nursing Management; February 2005: 48-49. Rosow, Eric, et al. Virtual instrumentation and real-time executive dashboards. Nurs Admin Q; 27, 1: 58-76. Simpson, Roy. The softer side of technology: How IT helps nursing care. Nurs Admin Q; 28, 4: 302-305.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Throughput: Technology Enabled Process Improvementen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMontgomery, Merylen_US
dc.contributor.authorPillai, Deepaken_US
dc.author.detailsMeryl Montgomery, RN, MSN, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Macon, Georgia, USA, email: montgomery.meryl@mccg.org; Deepak Pillai, MD, MBA, GE Healthcare Technologiesen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182866-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: In an environment of high patient and physician demand for beds, a 600 bed teaching hospital in the Southeast expanded previous nursing PI projects to address opportunities for improvement in patient turnaround time, satisfaction, admissions and other metrics. Numerous national benchmarking and standard setting entities such as Joint Commission, the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, American Hospital Association, The Advisory Board, among others, have clearly identified improved patient throughput as a national imperative. Utilizing qualitative research, Lean Six Sigma and Change Acceleration Processes, a combination of process improvement, RFID (radiofrequency) technology and an electronic patient care visibility display system was implemented to expand capacity and create a more efficient care environment. The new visibility and patient tracking system is networked across the hospital and allows rapid identification of available patient rooms and a synthesized single view of patient status. Together with workflow redesign, patient throughput challenges were addressed with both technology and process changes. The identification and monitoring of both high level and unit specific metrics has expanded nursing's understanding of the impact of nursing care practices. Initiating and sustaining the cultural change from "push" to "pull" has involved engagement, education, research, interdisciplinary involvement, administrative and front line commitment, a strong reward and recognition infrastructure, as well as communication and feedback regarding metrics. Demonstrated outcomes include earlier discharges, a left shift in discharge and admission practices to earlier in the day, improved inter-unit relationships, increased admissions, decreased delays in admission from ED and PACU, and increased patient and nurse satisfaction. References: Clark, Jonathan J. Unlocking hospital gridlock. hfm Nov. 2005 (pp 1-6). Patient flow survey, focus group and interview results- July 2005- November 2006 Medical Center of Central Georgia. Erdley, WS. Concept development of nursing information. CIN. March/April 2005: 93-99 Haraden, C. et al. Optimizing Patient Flow. Institute for Healthcare Improvement. 2003 white paper. Hawkins, DT. Information Visualization: Don't Tell Me, Show Me! www.onlineinc.com/onlinemag. Jan/Feb 1999;23,1; ABI/INFORM Global:88-90. Health Care Advisory Board. Maximizing Hospital Capacity: Expediting Patient Throughput in an Era of Shortage. Washington, D.C.: The Advisory Board (2002) Mahaffey, Samuel. Optimizing patient flow in the enterprise. Health Management Technology. August 2004; 25, 8: ABI/INFORM Global: 34-36. Parker, P. Technology alleviates bed management woes. Nursing Management; February 2005: 48-49. Rosow, Eric, et al. Virtual instrumentation and real-time executive dashboards. Nurs Admin Q; 27, 1: 58-76. Simpson, Roy. The softer side of technology: How IT helps nursing care. Nurs Admin Q; 28, 4: 302-305.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:43:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:43:37Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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