2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182868
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Improved RN/MD Relationships: Outcomes Associated with New Models of Patient Care
Author(s):
Moran, Judith; Milanese, Janet; Lahey, Barbara
Author Details:
Judith Moran, RN, DNSc, CNA, BC, Huntington Hospital, Huntington, New York, USA, email: jmoran@hunthosp.org; Janet Milanese, RN, MS, ANP, CNA, BC; Barbara Lahey, RN, BSN, BC
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: RN/MD relationships described as collegial, respectful and trustworthy are a distinguishing characteristic of Magnet-designated hospitals. Literature supports the fact that the presence of this new breed of physicians in the workplace provides a favorable milieu for collaboration with direct care nurses. Research findings show that effective communication between nurses and physicians improves the overall quality of patient care and results in safer clinical outcomes. Models of care using intensivists and hospitalists have been developed to improve continuity of care, improve compliance with quality measures, enhance patient and family satisfaction, prevent complications, and decrease costs associated with hospital length of stay. These outcomes are achieved through the implementation of evidence-based protocols and interdisciplinary team collaboration. Since the Intensivist Model of Care was begun in 2004 in our Magnet-designated community hospital, significant improvements in patient care outcomes have been achieved in ICU and CCU. These outcomes include a decrease in ventilator-associated days; reducing the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia in critically ill patients. The Hospitalist Program, which started in 2006, has had a positive influence on compliance with Core Measures. Feedback from direct care nurses indicates that working with intensivists and hospitalists has improved their clinical knowledge base, critical thinking skills, work-place satisfaction, and the overall quality of nursing care they provide. The mutual respect and trust between nurses, intensivists and hospitalists creates a culture of excellence where patient safety is paramount and quality outcomes are expected. References: American Organization of Nurse Executives - Guiding Principles for Excellence in Nurse/Physician Relationships (2006). Retrieved November 15, 2006, from http://www.aone.org/aone/resource/guidingprinciplesnursephysicianprinc.html Burke, M., Boal, J., & Mitchell, R. (2004). Communicating for better care: Improving nurse-physician communication. American Journal of Nursing, 104(12), 40-47. Dougherty, M., & Larson, E. (2005). A review of instruments measuring nurse-physician collaboration. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35(5), 244-253. Olender, L. (2005). Hospitalists: A chief nursing officer's perspective. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35(11), 497-501. Puntillo, K., & McAdam, J. (2006). Communication between physicians and nurses as a target for improving end-of-life care in the intensive care unit: Challenges and opportunities for moving forward. Critical Care Medicine, 34(11), S332-S340.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Improved RN/MD Relationships: Outcomes Associated with New Models of Patient Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.authorMilanese, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.authorLahey, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith Moran, RN, DNSc, CNA, BC, Huntington Hospital, Huntington, New York, USA, email: jmoran@hunthosp.org; Janet Milanese, RN, MS, ANP, CNA, BC; Barbara Lahey, RN, BSN, BCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182868-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: RN/MD relationships described as collegial, respectful and trustworthy are a distinguishing characteristic of Magnet-designated hospitals. Literature supports the fact that the presence of this new breed of physicians in the workplace provides a favorable milieu for collaboration with direct care nurses. Research findings show that effective communication between nurses and physicians improves the overall quality of patient care and results in safer clinical outcomes. Models of care using intensivists and hospitalists have been developed to improve continuity of care, improve compliance with quality measures, enhance patient and family satisfaction, prevent complications, and decrease costs associated with hospital length of stay. These outcomes are achieved through the implementation of evidence-based protocols and interdisciplinary team collaboration. Since the Intensivist Model of Care was begun in 2004 in our Magnet-designated community hospital, significant improvements in patient care outcomes have been achieved in ICU and CCU. These outcomes include a decrease in ventilator-associated days; reducing the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia in critically ill patients. The Hospitalist Program, which started in 2006, has had a positive influence on compliance with Core Measures. Feedback from direct care nurses indicates that working with intensivists and hospitalists has improved their clinical knowledge base, critical thinking skills, work-place satisfaction, and the overall quality of nursing care they provide. The mutual respect and trust between nurses, intensivists and hospitalists creates a culture of excellence where patient safety is paramount and quality outcomes are expected. References: American Organization of Nurse Executives - Guiding Principles for Excellence in Nurse/Physician Relationships (2006). Retrieved November 15, 2006, from http://www.aone.org/aone/resource/guidingprinciplesnursephysicianprinc.html Burke, M., Boal, J., & Mitchell, R. (2004). Communicating for better care: Improving nurse-physician communication. American Journal of Nursing, 104(12), 40-47. Dougherty, M., & Larson, E. (2005). A review of instruments measuring nurse-physician collaboration. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35(5), 244-253. Olender, L. (2005). Hospitalists: A chief nursing officer's perspective. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35(11), 497-501. Puntillo, K., & McAdam, J. (2006). Communication between physicians and nurses as a target for improving end-of-life care in the intensive care unit: Challenges and opportunities for moving forward. Critical Care Medicine, 34(11), S332-S340.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:43:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:43:42Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.