Professional Development Opportunities in Nursing Informatics: Three Magnet Nurses Tell Their Stories

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182869
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Professional Development Opportunities in Nursing Informatics: Three Magnet Nurses Tell Their Stories
Author(s):
Moran, Judith; Milanese, Janet; Lahey, Barbara
Author Details:
Judith Moran, RN, DNSc, CNA, BC, Huntington Hospital, Huntington, New York, USA, email: jmoran@hunthosp.org; Janet Milanese, RN, MS, ANP, CNA, BC; Barbara Lahey, RN, BSN, BC
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Professional development is a hallmark of hospitals recognized by the Magnet Program. Nurses in Magnet-designated hospitals work in environments that encourage learning and facilitate a myriad of professional learning experiences and opportunities for career advancement. Magnet nurses demonstrate exceptional competency and confidence in their areas of expertise. Over the past twenty years, informatics has become an area of intense interest for nurses as they have become overwhelmed by the increase in paperwork needed by governing agencies as evidence of positive patient outcomes. The ANA Scope and Standards of Nursing Informatics Practice states that nursing informatics facilitates the decision-making process in all roles and settings. Nurses in various types of informatics roles are at the forefront of creating a culture of safety. At our hospital, advanced educational preparation and certification in informatics has furthered the professional careers of three remarkable nurses. The stories of their professional development demonstrate in this poster session how they used the Forces of Magnetism to improve the quality of patient care through informatics. Their unique roles are: 1) a Staff Development Educator, whose position is budgeted 50% in Nursing and 50% in Information Technology, leading the medication safety taskforce to computerize medication reconciliation; 2) a Nursing Administrator spearheading automated clinical documentation in the Perioperative and Ambulatory Surgery areas; and 3) a former Nurse Manager permanently assigned to Information Technology to lead a hospital-wide project designing clinical information systems, and automating the medical record. References: Brokel, J. (2007). Creating sustainability of clinical information systems: The chief nurse officer and nurse informatics specialist roles. Journal of Nursing Administration, 37(1), 10-13. Effken, J. (2003). An organizing framework for nursing informatics research. Computers Informatics Nursing, 21(6), 316-325. Lewis, D. (2006). Report from the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) annual meeting. Computers Informatics Nursing, 24(1), 58-60. McDowell, D., & Ma, X. (2007). Computer literacy in baccalaureate nursing students during the last 8 years. Computers Informatics Nursing, 25(1), 30-36. Parker, P. (2005). One nurse informatics specialist views the future: Technology in the crystal ball. Nursing Administration, 29(2), 123-124. Zytkowski, M. (2003). Nursing informatics: The key to unlocking contemporary nursing practice. AACN Clinical Issues Advanced Practice in Acute Critical Care, 14(3), 271-281.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProfessional Development Opportunities in Nursing Informatics: Three Magnet Nurses Tell Their Storiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Judithen_US
dc.contributor.authorMilanese, Janeten_US
dc.contributor.authorLahey, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsJudith Moran, RN, DNSc, CNA, BC, Huntington Hospital, Huntington, New York, USA, email: jmoran@hunthosp.org; Janet Milanese, RN, MS, ANP, CNA, BC; Barbara Lahey, RN, BSN, BCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182869-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Professional development is a hallmark of hospitals recognized by the Magnet Program. Nurses in Magnet-designated hospitals work in environments that encourage learning and facilitate a myriad of professional learning experiences and opportunities for career advancement. Magnet nurses demonstrate exceptional competency and confidence in their areas of expertise. Over the past twenty years, informatics has become an area of intense interest for nurses as they have become overwhelmed by the increase in paperwork needed by governing agencies as evidence of positive patient outcomes. The ANA Scope and Standards of Nursing Informatics Practice states that nursing informatics facilitates the decision-making process in all roles and settings. Nurses in various types of informatics roles are at the forefront of creating a culture of safety. At our hospital, advanced educational preparation and certification in informatics has furthered the professional careers of three remarkable nurses. The stories of their professional development demonstrate in this poster session how they used the Forces of Magnetism to improve the quality of patient care through informatics. Their unique roles are: 1) a Staff Development Educator, whose position is budgeted 50% in Nursing and 50% in Information Technology, leading the medication safety taskforce to computerize medication reconciliation; 2) a Nursing Administrator spearheading automated clinical documentation in the Perioperative and Ambulatory Surgery areas; and 3) a former Nurse Manager permanently assigned to Information Technology to lead a hospital-wide project designing clinical information systems, and automating the medical record. References: Brokel, J. (2007). Creating sustainability of clinical information systems: The chief nurse officer and nurse informatics specialist roles. Journal of Nursing Administration, 37(1), 10-13. Effken, J. (2003). An organizing framework for nursing informatics research. Computers Informatics Nursing, 21(6), 316-325. Lewis, D. (2006). Report from the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) annual meeting. Computers Informatics Nursing, 24(1), 58-60. McDowell, D., & Ma, X. (2007). Computer literacy in baccalaureate nursing students during the last 8 years. Computers Informatics Nursing, 25(1), 30-36. Parker, P. (2005). One nurse informatics specialist views the future: Technology in the crystal ball. Nursing Administration, 29(2), 123-124. Zytkowski, M. (2003). Nursing informatics: The key to unlocking contemporary nursing practice. AACN Clinical Issues Advanced Practice in Acute Critical Care, 14(3), 271-281.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:43:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:43:45Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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