2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182876
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creating, Implementing and Evaluating a Hospital Lift Team
Author(s):
O'Malley, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia O'Malley, Ph.D., RN, CNS, Miami Valley Hospital, Dayton, Ohio, USA, email: pomalley@mvh.org
Abstract:
Concurrent Podium Presentation: Decades of research evidence suggest that nurse training in body mechanics and expensive lifting equipment fail to significantly prevent patient handling injuries. Reducing risks associated with patient handling may be a powerful force to keep experienced nurses at the bedside and attract novice nurses to begin a career free of back pain. This presentation describes the three-year outcomes of a successful hospital Lift Team model and provides tools for organizations to develop a Lift Team. This interdisciplinary project began with nurses in a unit-based council seeking ways to keep experienced nurses at the bedside by reducing the risk of injury when lifting or moving patients. A Lift Team model was developed and after three years, outcomes have exceeded expectations. In 2006, six members of the Lift Team provided 19,330 assists and nursing gained 2024 hours to care for patients when service was provided from 6am to midnight. The rate of back injuries per 1000 patient days decreased from 0.53 to 0.21. There have been NO injuries of Lift Team members during the life of the project, which may be related to training, fitness requirements and ongoing evaluation. After extending the project to a 24-hour service in 2007, we have found that eight lift team members are sufficient for 24-hour coverage for a 700+ bed hospital. References: O'Malley P, Emsley H, Davis D, Roark S, Ondercin C, Donaldson C. No Brawn Needed: Develop and Implement a Lift Team Policy to Improve Outcomes. Nursing Management. 2006; 37(4): 26-34. Also published in thePremier Issue- Men in Nursing. February 2006; 1(1):26-32
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCreating, Implementing and Evaluating a Hospital Lift Teamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Malley, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia O'Malley, Ph.D., RN, CNS, Miami Valley Hospital, Dayton, Ohio, USA, email: pomalley@mvh.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182876-
dc.description.abstractConcurrent Podium Presentation: Decades of research evidence suggest that nurse training in body mechanics and expensive lifting equipment fail to significantly prevent patient handling injuries. Reducing risks associated with patient handling may be a powerful force to keep experienced nurses at the bedside and attract novice nurses to begin a career free of back pain. This presentation describes the three-year outcomes of a successful hospital Lift Team model and provides tools for organizations to develop a Lift Team. This interdisciplinary project began with nurses in a unit-based council seeking ways to keep experienced nurses at the bedside by reducing the risk of injury when lifting or moving patients. A Lift Team model was developed and after three years, outcomes have exceeded expectations. In 2006, six members of the Lift Team provided 19,330 assists and nursing gained 2024 hours to care for patients when service was provided from 6am to midnight. The rate of back injuries per 1000 patient days decreased from 0.53 to 0.21. There have been NO injuries of Lift Team members during the life of the project, which may be related to training, fitness requirements and ongoing evaluation. After extending the project to a 24-hour service in 2007, we have found that eight lift team members are sufficient for 24-hour coverage for a 700+ bed hospital. References: O'Malley P, Emsley H, Davis D, Roark S, Ondercin C, Donaldson C. No Brawn Needed: Develop and Implement a Lift Team Policy to Improve Outcomes. Nursing Management. 2006; 37(4): 26-34. Also published in thePremier Issue- Men in Nursing. February 2006; 1(1):26-32en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:44:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:44:04Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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