2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182879
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Got Journals? Teaching Providers What to Do With the Journals Besides Dusting Them!
Author(s):
Bartlett, Jacqueline
Author Details:
Jacqueline Bartlett, RN, BSN, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, email: jbartlett@cmh.edu
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Historically health care providers (RNs and MDs) have obtained professional practice information traditionally from both formal and informal sources. Formal sources range from dictionaries to textbooks (Duffel, 1995). Informal sources are identified as the provider's peer group. However, this way of obtaining practice information has created a disconnect between front line research and actual clinical practice. This disconnect continues to widen because of the introduction of new technologies, the rapid growth of current evidence as well as the demonstration that cutting edge research typically takes seventeen years before it is reported in textbooks (Lappa, 2005; Melynk & Fineout-Overholt, et al., 2004). Because of this disconnect regulatory bodies and special interest groups, (The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the Commission on Magnet Recognition Program) have begun to require evidence that organizations are integrating research into practice. With the establishment of these regulations, a Midwestern Pediatric Medical Center (MPMC) created an interdisciplinary collaboration (MD's, RN's, and Allied Health) with the mission to eliminate the research-clinical practice disconnect. The collaboration surveyed providers asking them to identify their barriers for not incorporating current evidence into their practice. This presentation will highlight the identified provider barriers. It will share how MPMC overcame these barriers through the establishment, in July 2005, of an evidence-based curriculum which includes skills labs. The course curriculum will be shared with participants. Additionally, three patient care outcomes that were affected by this program will be discussed. References: Duffel, P.G. (1995). Finding information in the medical literature. Insight (American Society of Ophthalmic Registered Nurses), 20(2), 21-4. Lappa, E. (2005). Undertaking an information-needs analysis of the emergency-care physician to inform the role of the clinical librarian: a Greek perspective. Health Information & Libraries Journal, 22(2), 124-32. Melynk, B., Fineout-Overholt, E., Feinstein, N.F., Li, H., Small, L., Wilcox, L., & Kraus, R. (2004). Nurses' perceived knowledge, beliefs, skills and needs regarding evidence-based practice: Implications for accelerating the paradigm shift. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 1(3), 185-193.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGot Journals? Teaching Providers What to Do With the Journals Besides Dusting Them!en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBartlett, Jacquelineen_US
dc.author.detailsJacqueline Bartlett, RN, BSN, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri, USA, email: jbartlett@cmh.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182879-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Historically health care providers (RNs and MDs) have obtained professional practice information traditionally from both formal and informal sources. Formal sources range from dictionaries to textbooks (Duffel, 1995). Informal sources are identified as the provider's peer group. However, this way of obtaining practice information has created a disconnect between front line research and actual clinical practice. This disconnect continues to widen because of the introduction of new technologies, the rapid growth of current evidence as well as the demonstration that cutting edge research typically takes seventeen years before it is reported in textbooks (Lappa, 2005; Melynk & Fineout-Overholt, et al., 2004). Because of this disconnect regulatory bodies and special interest groups, (The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, and the Commission on Magnet Recognition Program) have begun to require evidence that organizations are integrating research into practice. With the establishment of these regulations, a Midwestern Pediatric Medical Center (MPMC) created an interdisciplinary collaboration (MD's, RN's, and Allied Health) with the mission to eliminate the research-clinical practice disconnect. The collaboration surveyed providers asking them to identify their barriers for not incorporating current evidence into their practice. This presentation will highlight the identified provider barriers. It will share how MPMC overcame these barriers through the establishment, in July 2005, of an evidence-based curriculum which includes skills labs. The course curriculum will be shared with participants. Additionally, three patient care outcomes that were affected by this program will be discussed. References: Duffel, P.G. (1995). Finding information in the medical literature. Insight (American Society of Ophthalmic Registered Nurses), 20(2), 21-4. Lappa, E. (2005). Undertaking an information-needs analysis of the emergency-care physician to inform the role of the clinical librarian: a Greek perspective. Health Information & Libraries Journal, 22(2), 124-32. Melynk, B., Fineout-Overholt, E., Feinstein, N.F., Li, H., Small, L., Wilcox, L., & Kraus, R. (2004). Nurses' perceived knowledge, beliefs, skills and needs regarding evidence-based practice: Implications for accelerating the paradigm shift. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing, 1(3), 185-193.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:44:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:44:11Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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