2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182886
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using a Business Model Strategy to Build Nursing Image in a Competitive Marketplace
Author(s):
Borne, Mary; Sorg, Julie Marie
Author Details:
Mary Borne, RN, MN, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: cborne@mednet.ucla.edu; Julie Marie Sorg, RN, MSN
Abstract:
Paper Presentation: It may seem easy for a Medical Center that has a worldwide reputation for clinical excellence and is consistently rated one of the top hospitals in the United States to recruit and retain nurses and build a positive image of nursing. However, as issues such as the nursing shortage, aging nurse population, and lack of nurse educators impacts the nursing profession it is increasingly important and a challenge for nurse leaders to attract and retain the "best" nurses. Despite excellent nursing programs and benefits, Magnet designation, and plenty of sunshine, the Medical Center's nurse vacancy rates continue to be a priority and concern. The department of nursing of a academic Medical Center implements a successful business level strategy and marketing plan in order to gain a competitive edge in the challenging California and national healthcare market. Using published nursing research, the organization's nursing model of care, and a business strategy and marketing plan, the nursing department sustains a low nurse vacancy rate of approximately 2% and employs a highly skilled and committed, "caring, compassionate, and connected" staff. As part of the business strategy to "be the national leader in inspiring the nursing profession" and attract and retain the "best nurses", the Medical Center has built a strong and impressive nursing image. The CNO, in collaboration with nurse recruitment and a professional marketing firm, established an internal and external nursing campaign using a message, "Don't be Afraid to be Great, Start with Great Ambitions, Great Achievements Follow", an image that globally attracts and inspires all nurses, encourages the organization's nursing team to be the "best", and supports Magnet designation. References: 1. Abrams, R. 2000. The Successful Business Plan: Secrets and Strategies. Third Edition. Palo Alto, California; Running "R" Media. 2. Haberfelde, M., Bedecarre, D., Buffum, M. (2005). Nurse-Sensitive Patient Outcomes: An Annotated Bibliography. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35 (6), 293-299. 3. McClure, M.L. (2005). Magnet Hospitals: Insights and Issues. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 29 (3), 198-201. 4. Ruggiero, J.S. (2005). Health, Work Variables, and Job Satisfaction Among Nurses. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35 (5), 254-263.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing a Business Model Strategy to Build Nursing Image in a Competitive Marketplaceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBorne, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorSorg, Julie Marieen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Borne, RN, MN, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: cborne@mednet.ucla.edu; Julie Marie Sorg, RN, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182886-
dc.description.abstractPaper Presentation: It may seem easy for a Medical Center that has a worldwide reputation for clinical excellence and is consistently rated one of the top hospitals in the United States to recruit and retain nurses and build a positive image of nursing. However, as issues such as the nursing shortage, aging nurse population, and lack of nurse educators impacts the nursing profession it is increasingly important and a challenge for nurse leaders to attract and retain the "best" nurses. Despite excellent nursing programs and benefits, Magnet designation, and plenty of sunshine, the Medical Center's nurse vacancy rates continue to be a priority and concern. The department of nursing of a academic Medical Center implements a successful business level strategy and marketing plan in order to gain a competitive edge in the challenging California and national healthcare market. Using published nursing research, the organization's nursing model of care, and a business strategy and marketing plan, the nursing department sustains a low nurse vacancy rate of approximately 2% and employs a highly skilled and committed, "caring, compassionate, and connected" staff. As part of the business strategy to "be the national leader in inspiring the nursing profession" and attract and retain the "best nurses", the Medical Center has built a strong and impressive nursing image. The CNO, in collaboration with nurse recruitment and a professional marketing firm, established an internal and external nursing campaign using a message, "Don't be Afraid to be Great, Start with Great Ambitions, Great Achievements Follow", an image that globally attracts and inspires all nurses, encourages the organization's nursing team to be the "best", and supports Magnet designation. References: 1. Abrams, R. 2000. The Successful Business Plan: Secrets and Strategies. Third Edition. Palo Alto, California; Running "R" Media. 2. Haberfelde, M., Bedecarre, D., Buffum, M. (2005). Nurse-Sensitive Patient Outcomes: An Annotated Bibliography. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35 (6), 293-299. 3. McClure, M.L. (2005). Magnet Hospitals: Insights and Issues. Nursing Administration Quarterly, 29 (3), 198-201. 4. Ruggiero, J.S. (2005). Health, Work Variables, and Job Satisfaction Among Nurses. Journal of Nursing Administration, 35 (5), 254-263.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:44:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:44:30Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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