2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182887
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
What Did You Say? Physician-Nurse Communication: A Qualitative Study
Author(s):
Boyle, Kathy
Author Details:
Kathy Boyle, RN, MS, PhDc, University of Colorado Hospital, Denver, Colorado, USA, email: kathy.boyle@uch.edu
Abstract:
Paper Presentation: Background: Failure of communication was reported as the major cause (66%) of sentinel events in healthcare from 1985 through 2004. Physician and nurse perceptions differ regarding effective communication. The purpose of this study was to gain understanding about the lived experience of communication between physicians and nurses. Increased awareness about communication patterns and styles may lead to enhanced professional dialogue and to improved patient safety. Methods A purposeful, criterion sample of 3 nurses and 6 physicians working in medical/surgical units were interviewed for this qualitative, descriptive study. Using opened-ended questions participants were asked to describe effective and ineffective experiences of communication with the other discipline. Interviews were audio tape recorded and transcribed for analysis. Analytic induction was used by 3 researchers to scan interviews for patterns and contexts of communication. Results/Outcomes Analysis of medical-surgical nurse and physician descriptions of communication between the two disciplines provided knowledge beyond the existing research conducted in intensive care units. Analytic induction revealed 3 main variables associated with specific participant statements: Modeling Communication, Building Collaboration, and Equalizing Power. Theoretical codes identified related to each of these variables included: effective communication behavior, physical presence of providers, negotiated outcomes, assertive behaviors, shared focus on best care for patients, need for physician education, respect, decreasing power differential, and role assumptions. Implications for Practice Improved understanding and training regarding the effective and ineffective elements of the physician-nurse relationship could result in: a more positive work environment, increased job satisfaction and retention, and positive patient outcomes. References: Baggs, J., Ryan, S., Phelps, C., Richeson, J., & Johnson, J. (1992). The association between interdisciplinary collaboration and patient outcomes in a medical intensive care unit. Heath & Lung, 21(1), 18-24. Baggs, J.G. & Schmitt, M.H. (1997). Nurses' and resident physicians' perceptions of the process of collaboration in an MICU. Research in Nursing & Health, 20, 71-80. Brink, P. & Wood, M. (1998). Advanced Design in Nursing Research. Sage Publications, Inc.: Thousand Oaks. Buerhaus, P. (2004). Lucian leap on patient safety in U.S. hospitals. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 36(4), 366-370. Coeling, H.V.E. & Cukr, P.L. (2000). Communication styles that promote perceptions of collaboration, quality, and nurse satisfaction. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 14(2), 63 ? 74. Creswell, J.W. (1998). Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing Among Five Traditions. Sage Publications, Inc.: Thousand Oaks Hansen, H., Bull, M., & Gross, C. (1998). Interdisciplinary Collaboration and Discharge Planning Communication for Elders. Journal of Nursing Administration, 28(9), 37-46. Institute of Medicine Report: To Err Is Human: Building a Safe Health System (2000). Washington D.C.: Committee on Quality of Heath Care in America. JCAHO Website [online] available: http://www.jcaho.org/ 2/4/05. Laverty, J. (2003). Investigating the experience of grandparent childcarers: reflection on using narrative inquiry. Based on unpublished master's thesis, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Retrieved February 6, 2005 from http://www.uws.edu/au/ [search word "Laverty"] Marshall, C. & Rossman, G. (1999). Designing qualitative research (3rd ed.). Newbury Park: Sage. Miller, P. (2001). Nurse-Physician Collaboration in an Intensive Care Unit. American Journal of Critical Care, 10(5), 341-350. Prescott, P. & Bowen, S. (1985). Physician Nurse Relationships. Annals of Internal Medicine, 103, 127-133. Rosenstein, A.H. (2002). Nurse - physician relationships: impact on nurse satisfaction and retention. American Journal of Nursing, 102(6), 26-34. Sandelowski, M. (2000). Whatever happened to qualitative description? Research in Nursing and Health, 23, 334-340. Spiegelberg, W. (1976). The phenomenological movement (2 vols.). The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff. Webster, M. (2005). [online] available: http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary - 2/7/05. Weiss, S. & Davis, H. (1985). Validity and Reliability of the Collaborative Practice Scales. Nursing Research, 34, 299-305.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhat Did You Say? Physician-Nurse Communication: A Qualitative Studyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Kathyen_US
dc.author.detailsKathy Boyle, RN, MS, PhDc, University of Colorado Hospital, Denver, Colorado, USA, email: kathy.boyle@uch.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182887-
dc.description.abstractPaper Presentation: Background: Failure of communication was reported as the major cause (66%) of sentinel events in healthcare from 1985 through 2004. Physician and nurse perceptions differ regarding effective communication. The purpose of this study was to gain understanding about the lived experience of communication between physicians and nurses. Increased awareness about communication patterns and styles may lead to enhanced professional dialogue and to improved patient safety. Methods A purposeful, criterion sample of 3 nurses and 6 physicians working in medical/surgical units were interviewed for this qualitative, descriptive study. Using opened-ended questions participants were asked to describe effective and ineffective experiences of communication with the other discipline. Interviews were audio tape recorded and transcribed for analysis. Analytic induction was used by 3 researchers to scan interviews for patterns and contexts of communication. Results/Outcomes Analysis of medical-surgical nurse and physician descriptions of communication between the two disciplines provided knowledge beyond the existing research conducted in intensive care units. Analytic induction revealed 3 main variables associated with specific participant statements: Modeling Communication, Building Collaboration, and Equalizing Power. Theoretical codes identified related to each of these variables included: effective communication behavior, physical presence of providers, negotiated outcomes, assertive behaviors, shared focus on best care for patients, need for physician education, respect, decreasing power differential, and role assumptions. Implications for Practice Improved understanding and training regarding the effective and ineffective elements of the physician-nurse relationship could result in: a more positive work environment, increased job satisfaction and retention, and positive patient outcomes. References: Baggs, J., Ryan, S., Phelps, C., Richeson, J., & Johnson, J. (1992). The association between interdisciplinary collaboration and patient outcomes in a medical intensive care unit. Heath & Lung, 21(1), 18-24. Baggs, J.G. & Schmitt, M.H. (1997). Nurses' and resident physicians' perceptions of the process of collaboration in an MICU. Research in Nursing & Health, 20, 71-80. Brink, P. & Wood, M. (1998). Advanced Design in Nursing Research. Sage Publications, Inc.: Thousand Oaks. Buerhaus, P. (2004). Lucian leap on patient safety in U.S. hospitals. Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 36(4), 366-370. Coeling, H.V.E. & Cukr, P.L. (2000). Communication styles that promote perceptions of collaboration, quality, and nurse satisfaction. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 14(2), 63 ? 74. Creswell, J.W. (1998). Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing Among Five Traditions. Sage Publications, Inc.: Thousand Oaks Hansen, H., Bull, M., & Gross, C. (1998). Interdisciplinary Collaboration and Discharge Planning Communication for Elders. Journal of Nursing Administration, 28(9), 37-46. Institute of Medicine Report: To Err Is Human: Building a Safe Health System (2000). Washington D.C.: Committee on Quality of Heath Care in America. JCAHO Website [online] available: http://www.jcaho.org/ 2/4/05. Laverty, J. (2003). Investigating the experience of grandparent childcarers: reflection on using narrative inquiry. Based on unpublished master's thesis, University of Western Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Retrieved February 6, 2005 from http://www.uws.edu/au/ [search word "Laverty"] Marshall, C. & Rossman, G. (1999). Designing qualitative research (3rd ed.). Newbury Park: Sage. Miller, P. (2001). Nurse-Physician Collaboration in an Intensive Care Unit. American Journal of Critical Care, 10(5), 341-350. Prescott, P. & Bowen, S. (1985). Physician Nurse Relationships. Annals of Internal Medicine, 103, 127-133. Rosenstein, A.H. (2002). Nurse - physician relationships: impact on nurse satisfaction and retention. American Journal of Nursing, 102(6), 26-34. Sandelowski, M. (2000). Whatever happened to qualitative description? Research in Nursing and Health, 23, 334-340. Spiegelberg, W. (1976). The phenomenological movement (2 vols.). The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff. Webster, M. (2005). [online] available: http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary - 2/7/05. Weiss, S. & Davis, H. (1985). Validity and Reliability of the Collaborative Practice Scales. Nursing Research, 34, 299-305.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:44:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:44:32Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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