2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182889
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Outcomes of Patients Experiencing Alcohol Withdrawal in the Acute Care Setting
Author(s):
Brown, Sherry
Author Details:
Sherry Brown, RN, MS, Clarian Health Partners, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: slbrown@clarian.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Alcohol dependence is a major public health problem. In large urban hospitals as many as 20% of patients in acute care experience alcohol withdrawal symptoms. In the acute care setting patients are hospitalized for a variety of problems ranging from multiple trauma to elective surgery or medical conditions. Many of these patients also have a history of alcohol use or abuse, putting them at risk for complications from alcohol withdrawal. It is imperative for physicians and nurses to recognize and appropriately treat the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal early to reduce the risk of complications. Unless given the appropriate tools to do this, management of symptoms of alcohol withdrawal may be subjective and treatment haphazardly administered. Symptoms can range from mild shakiness and tremors to hallucinations and seizures. Symptoms can be life threatening if not treated appropriately and in a timely manner. Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal typically present at 72 hours but can also occur as early as 5-10 hours after the last drink or up to 7-10 days later. The poster will describe the implementation of an evidence-based order set utilizing symptom-triggered management of alcohol withdrawal. Included in this process was development of an assessment tool to be used to assess the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal and guide the treatment of patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal. Through the implementation of a process for early identification and symptom-triggered management of alcohol withdrawal, an improvement in patient outcomes, length of stay and a decrease in complications has been realized. References: Adinoff B. Double-blind study of alprazlam, diazepam, clonidine and placebo in the alcohol withdrawal syndrome: preliminary findings. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1994; 18:873-8 Daeppen JB, et al. Symptom triggered vs fixed-schedule doses of benzodiazepine for alcohol withdrawal: a randomized treatment trial. Arch Intern Med. 2002; 162: 1117-1121 Mayo-Smith MF, et al. Pharmacological management of alcohol withdrawal: a meta-analysis and evidence-based practice guideline. JAMA 1997; 278: 144-151 Saitz R, et al. Individualized treatment for alcohol withdrawal: a randomized double-blind controlled trial. JAMA. 1994; 272: 519-523. Spies CD, et al. Alcohol withdrawal in the surgical patient: prevention and treatment. Anesthesia and Analgesia. 1999; 88: 946-954. Wojtecki, CA, et al. Systematic ED assessment and treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndromes: a pilot project at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2004; 30: 134-140.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Outcomes of Patients Experiencing Alcohol Withdrawal in the Acute Care Settingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Sherryen_US
dc.author.detailsSherry Brown, RN, MS, Clarian Health Partners, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: slbrown@clarian.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182889-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Alcohol dependence is a major public health problem. In large urban hospitals as many as 20% of patients in acute care experience alcohol withdrawal symptoms. In the acute care setting patients are hospitalized for a variety of problems ranging from multiple trauma to elective surgery or medical conditions. Many of these patients also have a history of alcohol use or abuse, putting them at risk for complications from alcohol withdrawal. It is imperative for physicians and nurses to recognize and appropriately treat the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal early to reduce the risk of complications. Unless given the appropriate tools to do this, management of symptoms of alcohol withdrawal may be subjective and treatment haphazardly administered. Symptoms can range from mild shakiness and tremors to hallucinations and seizures. Symptoms can be life threatening if not treated appropriately and in a timely manner. Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal typically present at 72 hours but can also occur as early as 5-10 hours after the last drink or up to 7-10 days later. The poster will describe the implementation of an evidence-based order set utilizing symptom-triggered management of alcohol withdrawal. Included in this process was development of an assessment tool to be used to assess the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal and guide the treatment of patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal. Through the implementation of a process for early identification and symptom-triggered management of alcohol withdrawal, an improvement in patient outcomes, length of stay and a decrease in complications has been realized. References: Adinoff B. Double-blind study of alprazlam, diazepam, clonidine and placebo in the alcohol withdrawal syndrome: preliminary findings. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 1994; 18:873-8 Daeppen JB, et al. Symptom triggered vs fixed-schedule doses of benzodiazepine for alcohol withdrawal: a randomized treatment trial. Arch Intern Med. 2002; 162: 1117-1121 Mayo-Smith MF, et al. Pharmacological management of alcohol withdrawal: a meta-analysis and evidence-based practice guideline. JAMA 1997; 278: 144-151 Saitz R, et al. Individualized treatment for alcohol withdrawal: a randomized double-blind controlled trial. JAMA. 1994; 272: 519-523. Spies CD, et al. Alcohol withdrawal in the surgical patient: prevention and treatment. Anesthesia and Analgesia. 1999; 88: 946-954. Wojtecki, CA, et al. Systematic ED assessment and treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndromes: a pilot project at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2004; 30: 134-140.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:44:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:44:37Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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