2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182893
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Going Up In Smoke!
Author(s):
Carter, Chris
Author Details:
Chris Carter, BSN, RN, Kettering Medical Center, Kettering, Ohio, USA, email: chris.carter@kmcnetwork.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Background: Nearly one in four people, in the United States, still use tobacco products despite the overwhelming evidence of related death and disability. This issue remains an urgent need in healthcare today. The average quit rate remains dismal regardless of the cessation programs that have become widespread across the United States. The average person will attempt as many as five to nine times to quit, if successful at all. The relationship between the levels of general self-efficacy, their personal belief in their ability to successfully stop smoking, has modestly been examined in an individual actively attempting to quit. The institution's mobile wellness van population is typically 200 percent above poverty guidelines and often uninsured. The low income and underinsured rate in Southwestern Ohio aligns with the national average of 10%. Many of this population utilize tobacco products as a coping mechanism for their stress levels. As much as 50% or more of the illnesses seen by nurses working the community van are the direct result of tobacco product use. Based on this fact, the need for a smoking cessation program became apparent. Methods: The purpose of this program is to utilize research to develop and implement a tobacco cessation program for the underserved community members. The program's behavioral component is based on the conceptual framework of Bandura's Social Cognitive theory and the American Cancer Association's 5-As program. Adults over 18 years of age, enroll in the four-week cessation program. The patients are encouraged to set a stop date either during the class or afterward and are followed at 30 and 60-day intervals to determine "quit status." Demographics target age, race, income level, educational status, and gender. The data will be analyzed for correlation between self-efficacy and ability to quit. The objective is to determine if the use of behavioral components of the tobacco cessation program combined with cessation techniques assist healthcare providers a method to predict a person's cessation abilities and adjust interventions accordingly to ensure a higher cessation success rate. Results: To date, 167 patients have participated with a quit rate of 22%, which is reflective of the national average of 25-28%. Statistical analysis and reporting will be complete prior to October 2006. Conclusion: The institution's community wellness van population correlates with the National Institute of Health's description of "hard core smokers." The population estimated to be the least likely to quit using tobacco products is the uninsured, low-income members of society. This project is one example of the research-based projects being conducted by the community van nurses to support the organization's mission: To improve the quality of life for the people in the communities being served. References: American Cancer Society National Institute of Health Department of Health and Human Services.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGoing Up In Smoke!en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarter, Chrisen_US
dc.author.detailsChris Carter, BSN, RN, Kettering Medical Center, Kettering, Ohio, USA, email: chris.carter@kmcnetwork.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182893-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Background: Nearly one in four people, in the United States, still use tobacco products despite the overwhelming evidence of related death and disability. This issue remains an urgent need in healthcare today. The average quit rate remains dismal regardless of the cessation programs that have become widespread across the United States. The average person will attempt as many as five to nine times to quit, if successful at all. The relationship between the levels of general self-efficacy, their personal belief in their ability to successfully stop smoking, has modestly been examined in an individual actively attempting to quit. The institution's mobile wellness van population is typically 200 percent above poverty guidelines and often uninsured. The low income and underinsured rate in Southwestern Ohio aligns with the national average of 10%. Many of this population utilize tobacco products as a coping mechanism for their stress levels. As much as 50% or more of the illnesses seen by nurses working the community van are the direct result of tobacco product use. Based on this fact, the need for a smoking cessation program became apparent. Methods: The purpose of this program is to utilize research to develop and implement a tobacco cessation program for the underserved community members. The program's behavioral component is based on the conceptual framework of Bandura's Social Cognitive theory and the American Cancer Association's 5-As program. Adults over 18 years of age, enroll in the four-week cessation program. The patients are encouraged to set a stop date either during the class or afterward and are followed at 30 and 60-day intervals to determine "quit status." Demographics target age, race, income level, educational status, and gender. The data will be analyzed for correlation between self-efficacy and ability to quit. The objective is to determine if the use of behavioral components of the tobacco cessation program combined with cessation techniques assist healthcare providers a method to predict a person's cessation abilities and adjust interventions accordingly to ensure a higher cessation success rate. Results: To date, 167 patients have participated with a quit rate of 22%, which is reflective of the national average of 25-28%. Statistical analysis and reporting will be complete prior to October 2006. Conclusion: The institution's community wellness van population correlates with the National Institute of Health's description of "hard core smokers." The population estimated to be the least likely to quit using tobacco products is the uninsured, low-income members of society. This project is one example of the research-based projects being conducted by the community van nurses to support the organization's mission: To improve the quality of life for the people in the communities being served. References: American Cancer Society National Institute of Health Department of Health and Human Services.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:44:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:44:47Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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