2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182899
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Violence in the House of Healing
Author(s):
Ditmer, Dianne
Author Details:
Dianne Ditmer, Ph.D., RN, DABFN, Kettering Medical Center, Kettering, Ohio, USA, email: dianne.ditmer@kmcnetwork.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Society can no longer consider healthcare institutions as sacred ground, immune from acts of violence. The alarming number of violent acts compels us to increase worker and employer awareness of risk factors for violence in healthcare settings and to provide strategies for reducing exposure. Nurses, who are both victims and perpetrators of violence, frequently do not recognize the full continuum and broad definition of workplace violence. The purpose of this presentation is to identify the types and frequency of violent behaviors reported by nurses. This presentation is based upon a study that examines and correlates the nurses' understanding of the definition of workplace violence in relationship to the violence they have experienced in the hospital setting. Nurses' perceived ability to handle violence is also correlated to their perception of victimization. The hypotheses for this study are: Nurses do not consistently recognize workplace violence and are not prepared to handle violence in the hospital setting. Nurses define workplace violence in terms of physical injuries and do not recognize other, more common, forms of violence. The research design for this study includes a confidential, self-report questionnaire based upon literature review of related topics including workplace violence, violence against nurses, nursing culture, medical hierarchy, stress, and nurse retention. Nursing staff are asked to respond regarding definition of violence, perceived victimization, ability to handle violence, types of violent behaviors experienced, frequency, source, nursing staff response, and formal actions taken to report the event. Research findings support the hypotheses as 88.9% of the respondents report experiencing workplace violence, 71% do not recognize themselves as victims, and 56.6% do not feel prepared to handle violence in the workplace. Based upon these findings, a violence prevention and workplace safety program was developed with implications for the profession of nursing and the healthcare community. References: Crisis Prevention Institute, 2002; OSHA Guidelines for Prevention of Workplace Violence, 1998, 2003; Lewis & Zare, 1999; NIOSH, 1996, 2002; Bruder, 2001; McKoy & Smith, 2001; Bureau of Justice statistics, 1998.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleViolence in the House of Healingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDitmer, Dianneen_US
dc.author.detailsDianne Ditmer, Ph.D., RN, DABFN, Kettering Medical Center, Kettering, Ohio, USA, email: dianne.ditmer@kmcnetwork.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182899-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Society can no longer consider healthcare institutions as sacred ground, immune from acts of violence. The alarming number of violent acts compels us to increase worker and employer awareness of risk factors for violence in healthcare settings and to provide strategies for reducing exposure. Nurses, who are both victims and perpetrators of violence, frequently do not recognize the full continuum and broad definition of workplace violence. The purpose of this presentation is to identify the types and frequency of violent behaviors reported by nurses. This presentation is based upon a study that examines and correlates the nurses' understanding of the definition of workplace violence in relationship to the violence they have experienced in the hospital setting. Nurses' perceived ability to handle violence is also correlated to their perception of victimization. The hypotheses for this study are: Nurses do not consistently recognize workplace violence and are not prepared to handle violence in the hospital setting. Nurses define workplace violence in terms of physical injuries and do not recognize other, more common, forms of violence. The research design for this study includes a confidential, self-report questionnaire based upon literature review of related topics including workplace violence, violence against nurses, nursing culture, medical hierarchy, stress, and nurse retention. Nursing staff are asked to respond regarding definition of violence, perceived victimization, ability to handle violence, types of violent behaviors experienced, frequency, source, nursing staff response, and formal actions taken to report the event. Research findings support the hypotheses as 88.9% of the respondents report experiencing workplace violence, 71% do not recognize themselves as victims, and 56.6% do not feel prepared to handle violence in the workplace. Based upon these findings, a violence prevention and workplace safety program was developed with implications for the profession of nursing and the healthcare community. References: Crisis Prevention Institute, 2002; OSHA Guidelines for Prevention of Workplace Violence, 1998, 2003; Lewis & Zare, 1999; NIOSH, 1996, 2002; Bruder, 2001; McKoy & Smith, 2001; Bureau of Justice statistics, 1998.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:45:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:45:04Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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