2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182917
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Resuscitative Hypothermia After Cardiac Arrest
Author(s):
Grimes, Cindy; Kirchman, Marilyn
Author Details:
Cindy Grimes, RN, Sarasota Memorial Health Care System, Sarasota, Florida, USA, email: cindy-grimes@smh.com; Marilyn Kirchman, RN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Purpose: Introduce the interdisciplinary practice of induced hypothermia to improve cardiac arrest outcomes in a community hospital, monitor patient response and outcomes to associated medical/nursing interventions. Methods: After specialized education/training of ER/CIC/ICU physician's/nurses, a case-control study was conducted in a publicly owned, non-academic, acute care hospital. 38 induced hypothermia patients were compared to 103 control patients. After resuscitation patients underwent hypothermia using an established protocol at the discretion of the treating clinicians. Outcome measures included mortality, neurologic recovery, and length of stay (LOS). Results: Groups were similar in age, sex, APACHE III score, and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS). Hospital mortality in the hypothermia group was 53% versus 71% in the control group (p=0.07). Mortality ratio was 0.76, versus 1.4 for the control group. Hypothermia group GCS from admission to discharge was 7.2 + 4.0. (baseline 4.4, discharge 11.7) and control group 6.6 + 4.3 (baseline 4.0, discharge 10.6) (p=0.32). Hypothermia survivors ICU LOS was 2.6 + 3.5 days < predicted versus 0.5 + 6.8 days less in the control group (p= 0.06). Conclusion: Induced hypothermia following cardiac arrest can be successfully delivered and managed by nurses in a community hospital setting. Effective cooling is achieved through implementation/enforcement of strong hospital approved nursing care protocols. Clinical Implications: Protocols may help to ensure timely intervention. Intravascular cooling techniques show promise in ease of use, effectiveness of cooling and maintaining easy accessibility to the patient by the nurses and physicians. Further nursing research should examine symptom management and quality of life issues.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResuscitative Hypothermia After Cardiac Arresten_GB
dc.contributor.authorGrimes, Cindyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKirchman, Marilynen_US
dc.author.detailsCindy Grimes, RN, Sarasota Memorial Health Care System, Sarasota, Florida, USA, email: cindy-grimes@smh.com; Marilyn Kirchman, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182917-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Purpose: Introduce the interdisciplinary practice of induced hypothermia to improve cardiac arrest outcomes in a community hospital, monitor patient response and outcomes to associated medical/nursing interventions. Methods: After specialized education/training of ER/CIC/ICU physician's/nurses, a case-control study was conducted in a publicly owned, non-academic, acute care hospital. 38 induced hypothermia patients were compared to 103 control patients. After resuscitation patients underwent hypothermia using an established protocol at the discretion of the treating clinicians. Outcome measures included mortality, neurologic recovery, and length of stay (LOS). Results: Groups were similar in age, sex, APACHE III score, and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS). Hospital mortality in the hypothermia group was 53% versus 71% in the control group (p=0.07). Mortality ratio was 0.76, versus 1.4 for the control group. Hypothermia group GCS from admission to discharge was 7.2 + 4.0. (baseline 4.4, discharge 11.7) and control group 6.6 + 4.3 (baseline 4.0, discharge 10.6) (p=0.32). Hypothermia survivors ICU LOS was 2.6 + 3.5 days &lt; predicted versus 0.5 + 6.8 days less in the control group (p= 0.06). Conclusion: Induced hypothermia following cardiac arrest can be successfully delivered and managed by nurses in a community hospital setting. Effective cooling is achieved through implementation/enforcement of strong hospital approved nursing care protocols. Clinical Implications: Protocols may help to ensure timely intervention. Intravascular cooling techniques show promise in ease of use, effectiveness of cooling and maintaining easy accessibility to the patient by the nurses and physicians. Further nursing research should examine symptom management and quality of life issues.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:45:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:45:54Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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