2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182943
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Race Is On: Improving Pre-Operative Antibiotic Timing
Author(s):
Krutz, Kimiko; Kemper, Irene
Author Details:
Kimiko Krutz, MSN, ONC, Saint Elizabeth Regional Medical Center, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA, email: kkrutz@stez.org; Irene Kemper, BSN, CIC
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Background: Audits looking at pre-operative antibiotic dosing for hip arthroplasty was steadily increasing beyond the 60 minute window. At the same time, nurses from the Orthopaedic unit were reporting concern over an increased number of infections in the arthroplastic population. The Surgical Infection Prevention Team decided to do chart audits to review how care compared to the CMS directed guidelines of surgical site infection prevention project. The Surgical Site Infection Team decided to focus on preoperative antibiotic to be given within 60 minutes as a method of decreasing surgical site infections. The plan started with a review of the process and identifying activities that delayed preoperative antibiotic dosing. The group focused on small changes with immediate feedback to evaluate how the change process worked. Once details worked within the small process change, the process was moved to a larger group, again with feedback. This process continues to evolve to improve preoperative antibiotic dosing. Currently, we are at around 80% of preoperative antibiotic dosing given within 60 minutes. The team would like to reach 100% of antibiotics given within one hour. The preoperative antibiotic dosing is one of the process changes out of several with the ultimate target of significantly reducing the number of postoperative infections in arthroplasties. References: Bratzler, D.W. et Houck, P.M. (2004). Antimicrobial prophylaxis for surgery: and advisory statement from the national surgical infection prevention project. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 38:1706-15. Mangram, A.J. et al. (1999). Guidelines for prevention of surgical site infection, 1999. Infection control and hospital epidemiology. 20 (4): 247-278.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Race Is On: Improving Pre-Operative Antibiotic Timingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKrutz, Kimikoen_US
dc.contributor.authorKemper, Ireneen_US
dc.author.detailsKimiko Krutz, MSN, ONC, Saint Elizabeth Regional Medical Center, Lincoln, Nebraska, USA, email: kkrutz@stez.org; Irene Kemper, BSN, CICen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182943-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Background: Audits looking at pre-operative antibiotic dosing for hip arthroplasty was steadily increasing beyond the 60 minute window. At the same time, nurses from the Orthopaedic unit were reporting concern over an increased number of infections in the arthroplastic population. The Surgical Infection Prevention Team decided to do chart audits to review how care compared to the CMS directed guidelines of surgical site infection prevention project. The Surgical Site Infection Team decided to focus on preoperative antibiotic to be given within 60 minutes as a method of decreasing surgical site infections. The plan started with a review of the process and identifying activities that delayed preoperative antibiotic dosing. The group focused on small changes with immediate feedback to evaluate how the change process worked. Once details worked within the small process change, the process was moved to a larger group, again with feedback. This process continues to evolve to improve preoperative antibiotic dosing. Currently, we are at around 80% of preoperative antibiotic dosing given within 60 minutes. The team would like to reach 100% of antibiotics given within one hour. The preoperative antibiotic dosing is one of the process changes out of several with the ultimate target of significantly reducing the number of postoperative infections in arthroplasties. References: Bratzler, D.W. et Houck, P.M. (2004). Antimicrobial prophylaxis for surgery: and advisory statement from the national surgical infection prevention project. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 38:1706-15. Mangram, A.J. et al. (1999). Guidelines for prevention of surgical site infection, 1999. Infection control and hospital epidemiology. 20 (4): 247-278.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:47:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:47:11Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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