2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182957
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evolving Rapid Response Team: Policies and Outcomes
Author(s):
Montgomery, Meryl
Author Details:
Meryl Montgomery, RN, MSN, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Macon, Georgia, USA, email: montgomery.meryl@mccg.org
Abstract:
Paper Presentation: Rapid Response Team: Ahead of the Pack and Evolving One of the IHI 100,000 Lives Campaign initiatives is to develop a Rapid Response Team that would place clinical experts at the bedside prior to cardiac or respiratory arrest. For one hospital, this has been a journey of cultural change which began twenty years ago when the survival-to-discharge rate of Codes was 16%. In 1985 the Code Blue policy was changed from "call a code for a cardiopulmonary arrest" to "call a code to prevent a code." Over the next few years, roles were formalized, code carts standardized, clinical practice guidelines adopted, QI initiated, staff educated, and research conducted and published. When one of our papers demonstrated a significant correlation between ACLS training and outcomes, ACLS was made a standard in telemetry and critical care areas and CPR required annually. As a result of several changes, our survival to discharge has increased to 32%. We realized that in many key ways our Code team had achieved the expected outcomes of Rapid Response Teams; thus our implementation of the IHI imitative would be unique. Using the Iowa Evidence Based Practice Model, we researched several aspects of early recognition of patient problems including antecedents and preventability, applicability of Benner's model in responding to patient deterioration, nurse satisfaction with availability of clinical experts, among others. Our rapid response team, called KITCAT (Kids Intervention Team and adult Clinical Assessment Team), is developing into a strong nurse consultation and nurse research model. References: Benner, P., Hooper-Dyriakidis, P., Stannard, D. (1999) Clinical Wisdom and Interventions in Critical Care. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders. Ballew KA, Philbrick, JT. Causes of variation in reported in-hospital CPR survival: a critical review. Resuscitation 30 (1995) 203-215. Minick P, Harvey S. The early recognition of patient problems among medical-surgical nurses. MEDSURG Nursing 2003; 12(5) 291-297. Dane FC, Russell-Lindgren KS, et al. In-hospital resuscitation: association between ACLS training and survival to discharge. Resuscitation. 2001 June; 49(3): 319-321. DeVita MA, et al. Use of medical emergency team responses to reduce hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Qual Saf Health Care 2004:13;251-254. IHI.org, 100,000 Lives Campaign. Institute for Healthcare Improvement: Establish a Rapid Response Team. 2005. Bellomo R, Goldsmith D., et al. A prospective before-and-after trial of a medical emergency team. MJA 15 Sept. 2003; 179:283-287. Rich, K. Inhospital cardiac arrest: pre-event variables and nursing response. Clinical Nurse Specialist 1999. 13(3): 147-153. Simmonds TC. Implementing a rapid response system of care. Nursing Management 2005:36(7):41-42, 58-59.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvolving Rapid Response Team: Policies and Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMontgomery, Merylen_US
dc.author.detailsMeryl Montgomery, RN, MSN, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Macon, Georgia, USA, email: montgomery.meryl@mccg.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182957-
dc.description.abstractPaper Presentation: Rapid Response Team: Ahead of the Pack and Evolving One of the IHI 100,000 Lives Campaign initiatives is to develop a Rapid Response Team that would place clinical experts at the bedside prior to cardiac or respiratory arrest. For one hospital, this has been a journey of cultural change which began twenty years ago when the survival-to-discharge rate of Codes was 16%. In 1985 the Code Blue policy was changed from "call a code for a cardiopulmonary arrest" to "call a code to prevent a code." Over the next few years, roles were formalized, code carts standardized, clinical practice guidelines adopted, QI initiated, staff educated, and research conducted and published. When one of our papers demonstrated a significant correlation between ACLS training and outcomes, ACLS was made a standard in telemetry and critical care areas and CPR required annually. As a result of several changes, our survival to discharge has increased to 32%. We realized that in many key ways our Code team had achieved the expected outcomes of Rapid Response Teams; thus our implementation of the IHI imitative would be unique. Using the Iowa Evidence Based Practice Model, we researched several aspects of early recognition of patient problems including antecedents and preventability, applicability of Benner's model in responding to patient deterioration, nurse satisfaction with availability of clinical experts, among others. Our rapid response team, called KITCAT (Kids Intervention Team and adult Clinical Assessment Team), is developing into a strong nurse consultation and nurse research model. References: Benner, P., Hooper-Dyriakidis, P., Stannard, D. (1999) Clinical Wisdom and Interventions in Critical Care. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders. Ballew KA, Philbrick, JT. Causes of variation in reported in-hospital CPR survival: a critical review. Resuscitation 30 (1995) 203-215. Minick P, Harvey S. The early recognition of patient problems among medical-surgical nurses. MEDSURG Nursing 2003; 12(5) 291-297. Dane FC, Russell-Lindgren KS, et al. In-hospital resuscitation: association between ACLS training and survival to discharge. Resuscitation. 2001 June; 49(3): 319-321. DeVita MA, et al. Use of medical emergency team responses to reduce hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Qual Saf Health Care 2004:13;251-254. IHI.org, 100,000 Lives Campaign. Institute for Healthcare Improvement: Establish a Rapid Response Team. 2005. Bellomo R, Goldsmith D., et al. A prospective before-and-after trial of a medical emergency team. MJA 15 Sept. 2003; 179:283-287. Rich, K. Inhospital cardiac arrest: pre-event variables and nursing response. Clinical Nurse Specialist 1999. 13(3): 147-153. Simmonds TC. Implementing a rapid response system of care. Nursing Management 2005:36(7):41-42, 58-59.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:47:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:47:51Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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