2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182961
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Collaboration Between Nurses and Ethicists Builds Strong Programs
Author(s):
Neumann, Joyce; Swint, Kay
Author Details:
Joyce Neumann, RN, MSN, PhD (c), AOCN, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: jneumann@mdanderson.org; Kay Swint RN, MSN, CHPN
Abstract:
Paper Presentation: Nurses are confronted by situations that may challenge their technical skills, intellect, as well as beliefs, values and principles. Patients and their families face uncertainty related to treatment options and outcomes that may lead to difficulty in decision making and present potential for ethical dilemmas. Having a professional responsibility to advocate for patients, nurses have to come to terms with competing ethical principles presented by differences in resource allocation, religious beliefs, and societal mores. The purpose of this presentation is to identify nursing involvement with institutional leadership to develop a strong ethics presence that assures nurses at all levels are educated and supported in applying ethical principles in nursing practice. At our institution, nurses influenced the restructuring of the Ethics Program to transition from a physician led structure to an ethicist led program with equal representation of nurses, physicians and other disciplines. As a result, nurses are rotated every third year as the Chairperson of the Ethics Committee. Nurses represent one-third of the adjuvant ethicists. Nurses lead task forces to define processes key to ethical practice. Nursing orientation includes ethics content geared to nursing practice concerns. An advanced practice nurse who is also an adjuvant ethicist will discuss clinical initiatives in an area of clinical focus, including: ethics rounds, informal ethics consult, advanced directive taskforce, care conferences, self-care and caregiver agreements, and creation of a compliance algorithm/pathway. Results of a nurse survey examining barriers to utilizing the ethics service and the results of this study will be shared. References: Corley, M., Minick, P., Elswick, R., Jacobs, M. (2005) Nurse Moral Distress and Ethical Work Environment. Nursing Ethics, 12(4),381-390 Smith, M., Bisanz, A., Kempler, A., Adams, B., Candelari, T., Blackburn, R. Criteria for Determining the Appropriate Method for an Ethics Consultation. HEC Forum 2004: 16(2): 95-113.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCollaboration Between Nurses and Ethicists Builds Strong Programsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNeumann, Joyceen_US
dc.contributor.authorSwint, Kayen_US
dc.author.detailsJoyce Neumann, RN, MSN, PhD (c), AOCN, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: jneumann@mdanderson.org; Kay Swint RN, MSN, CHPNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182961-
dc.description.abstractPaper Presentation: Nurses are confronted by situations that may challenge their technical skills, intellect, as well as beliefs, values and principles. Patients and their families face uncertainty related to treatment options and outcomes that may lead to difficulty in decision making and present potential for ethical dilemmas. Having a professional responsibility to advocate for patients, nurses have to come to terms with competing ethical principles presented by differences in resource allocation, religious beliefs, and societal mores. The purpose of this presentation is to identify nursing involvement with institutional leadership to develop a strong ethics presence that assures nurses at all levels are educated and supported in applying ethical principles in nursing practice. At our institution, nurses influenced the restructuring of the Ethics Program to transition from a physician led structure to an ethicist led program with equal representation of nurses, physicians and other disciplines. As a result, nurses are rotated every third year as the Chairperson of the Ethics Committee. Nurses represent one-third of the adjuvant ethicists. Nurses lead task forces to define processes key to ethical practice. Nursing orientation includes ethics content geared to nursing practice concerns. An advanced practice nurse who is also an adjuvant ethicist will discuss clinical initiatives in an area of clinical focus, including: ethics rounds, informal ethics consult, advanced directive taskforce, care conferences, self-care and caregiver agreements, and creation of a compliance algorithm/pathway. Results of a nurse survey examining barriers to utilizing the ethics service and the results of this study will be shared. References: Corley, M., Minick, P., Elswick, R., Jacobs, M. (2005) Nurse Moral Distress and Ethical Work Environment. Nursing Ethics, 12(4),381-390 Smith, M., Bisanz, A., Kempler, A., Adams, B., Candelari, T., Blackburn, R. Criteria for Determining the Appropriate Method for an Ethics Consultation. HEC Forum 2004: 16(2): 95-113.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:48:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:48:02Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.