2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182962
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Foley Catheter Management and Care: Using the Evidence and Research to Change Practice
Author(s):
Ninni, Sherry
Author Details:
Sherry (Sharon) Ninni, RN, BSN, CCRN, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey, USA, email: sherry.ninni@atlantichealth.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Patient safety by reducing hospital-acquired infections is of primary importance in the goals of patient care outcomes. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most prevalent hospital-acquired infection and can lead to an increase in morbidity, mortality, and costs. Foley catheter use is associated with a greater risk of acquiring a hospital induced UTI. This evidence-based nursing research initiative has led to a decrease in UTIs and improved patient outcomes by decreasing Foley catheter device days in an intensive care unit (ICU). A multidisciplinary approach with staff involvement was utilized to gain support and buy-in for change. Criteria for appropriate foley catheter use was developed using best practice research and multidisciplinary input. The implementation of educational in-services, a criteria-based Foley catheter checklist, and a decision-making algorithm led to a statistically significant reduction in device days. The checklist acted as a trigger and if the patient did not meet criteria for the Foley catheter the nurse would initiate a recommendation to the physician for catheter removal. This change in clinical practice resulted in a 33% reduction in UTIs one year post-intervention. Continued monitoring of a monthly random sample has shown that this improvement has been sustained over time. A hospital-wide Foley catheter initiative is now underway to spread this innovation and evaluate current hospital policy and practices regarding the care and management of Foley catheters and move to a more evidence-based approach to care. References: 1. Brosnahan J, Jull A, Tracy C. (with Cochrane Incontinence Group). Types of urethral catheters for management of short-term voiding problems in hospitalized adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005; Volume 1: [Data File]. Sidney, Australia. 2. Cravens D., & Zweig S. Urinary catheter management. American Family Physician 2000; 61 (2): 369 - 376. 3. Evidence Based Practice Information Sheets for Health Professionals. Management of short term indwelling urethral catheters to prevent urinary tract infections. Best Practice 2000; 4 (1): ISSN 1329 -1874, 1-6. 4. Goolsarran, V. & Katz T. Do not go with the flow, remember indwelling catheters. JAGS 2002; 50: 1739 - 1740. 5. Gray M. What nursing interventions reduce the risk of symptomatic urinary tract infection in the patient with an indwelling catheter? J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2004; 31(1):3-13. 6. Johnson, J. Nosocomial and catheter- associated urinary tract infections. Association for Practitioners for Infection Control; Clinical Syndromes 2002; 92: 1-10. 7. Leithauser, D. Urinary tract infections. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. 2004; 25: 1-15. 8. Rosser C., Bare R. & Meredith J. Urinary tract infections in the critically ill patient with urinary catheter. American Journal of Surgery,1999; 177(4), 287-90. 9. Sulzbach-Hoke L. & Schanne L. Using a portable ultrasound bladder scanner in the cardiac care unit. Critical Care Nurse 1999; 19 (6): 35. 10. Tambyah, P. & Maki, D. Catheter associated urinary tract infection is rarely symptomatic. Arch Intern Med 2000; 160: 678 - 682. 11. Thorton G., Andriole, V. Bacteriuria during indwelling catheter drainage: II. Effect of a closed sterile drainage system. JAMA 1970; 214: 339-342. 12. Tissot, E., Limat, S., & Cornette, C. Risk factors for catheter associated bacteriuria in a medical intensive care unit. Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases 2001; 20(4), 260-262. 13. Wong, E. & Hooton, T. Guideline for prevention of catheter associated urinary tract infections. 1981; Center for Disease Control Guide.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFoley Catheter Management and Care: Using the Evidence and Research to Change Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNinni, Sherryen_US
dc.author.detailsSherry (Sharon) Ninni, RN, BSN, CCRN, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey, USA, email: sherry.ninni@atlantichealth.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182962-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Patient safety by reducing hospital-acquired infections is of primary importance in the goals of patient care outcomes. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most prevalent hospital-acquired infection and can lead to an increase in morbidity, mortality, and costs. Foley catheter use is associated with a greater risk of acquiring a hospital induced UTI. This evidence-based nursing research initiative has led to a decrease in UTIs and improved patient outcomes by decreasing Foley catheter device days in an intensive care unit (ICU). A multidisciplinary approach with staff involvement was utilized to gain support and buy-in for change. Criteria for appropriate foley catheter use was developed using best practice research and multidisciplinary input. The implementation of educational in-services, a criteria-based Foley catheter checklist, and a decision-making algorithm led to a statistically significant reduction in device days. The checklist acted as a trigger and if the patient did not meet criteria for the Foley catheter the nurse would initiate a recommendation to the physician for catheter removal. This change in clinical practice resulted in a 33% reduction in UTIs one year post-intervention. Continued monitoring of a monthly random sample has shown that this improvement has been sustained over time. A hospital-wide Foley catheter initiative is now underway to spread this innovation and evaluate current hospital policy and practices regarding the care and management of Foley catheters and move to a more evidence-based approach to care. References: 1. Brosnahan J, Jull A, Tracy C. (with Cochrane Incontinence Group). Types of urethral catheters for management of short-term voiding problems in hospitalized adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005; Volume 1: [Data File]. Sidney, Australia. 2. Cravens D., & Zweig S. Urinary catheter management. American Family Physician 2000; 61 (2): 369 - 376. 3. Evidence Based Practice Information Sheets for Health Professionals. Management of short term indwelling urethral catheters to prevent urinary tract infections. Best Practice 2000; 4 (1): ISSN 1329 -1874, 1-6. 4. Goolsarran, V. & Katz T. Do not go with the flow, remember indwelling catheters. JAGS 2002; 50: 1739 - 1740. 5. Gray M. What nursing interventions reduce the risk of symptomatic urinary tract infection in the patient with an indwelling catheter? J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs. 2004; 31(1):3-13. 6. Johnson, J. Nosocomial and catheter- associated urinary tract infections. Association for Practitioners for Infection Control; Clinical Syndromes 2002; 92: 1-10. 7. Leithauser, D. Urinary tract infections. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. 2004; 25: 1-15. 8. Rosser C., Bare R. & Meredith J. Urinary tract infections in the critically ill patient with urinary catheter. American Journal of Surgery,1999; 177(4), 287-90. 9. Sulzbach-Hoke L. & Schanne L. Using a portable ultrasound bladder scanner in the cardiac care unit. Critical Care Nurse 1999; 19 (6): 35. 10. Tambyah, P. & Maki, D. Catheter associated urinary tract infection is rarely symptomatic. Arch Intern Med 2000; 160: 678 - 682. 11. Thorton G., Andriole, V. Bacteriuria during indwelling catheter drainage: II. Effect of a closed sterile drainage system. JAMA 1970; 214: 339-342. 12. Tissot, E., Limat, S., & Cornette, C. Risk factors for catheter associated bacteriuria in a medical intensive care unit. Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases 2001; 20(4), 260-262. 13. Wong, E. & Hooton, T. Guideline for prevention of catheter associated urinary tract infections. 1981; Center for Disease Control Guide.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:48:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:48:05Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.