2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182965
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies for Keeping Veteran Nurses at the Bedside
Author(s):
Ostermeier, Lydia; Wolverton, Cheryl
Author Details:
Lydia Ostermeier, RN, BSN, Clarian Health Partners, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, mail: losterme@clarian.org; Cheryl Wolverton, MSN, RN
Abstract:
Paper Presentation: The nation's aging workforce poses unique challenges for employers seeking to retain top-notch talent. As retirement-eligible employees continue working, companies are recruiting, retaining and developing benefits plans tailored for them in order to gain a competitive edge. With nursing shortages estimated at 800,000 by the year 2002, health care employers are finding creative ways to extend workforce longevity and retain veteran, expert nurses. An urban Midwest hospital system employing more than 4,000 nurses, devotes significant resources toward nurse recruitment and retention efforts is putting greater focus on veteran bedside nurses. A workforce for keeping RNs at the bedside is conducting focus groups and devising strategies to help improve "a typical day" for a bedside nurse. Issues addressed: Shift flexibility, Physical and mental demands of the work, Unit ergonomic improvements, Enhanced perks/ benefits, and Cultural beliefs and approaches to aging. A pilot RELAY Team (Responsive Ergonomic Lift Assistance for You) of specially-trained nurses provides scheduled and urgent assistance with patient repositioning, turning, transfer and lifting. Research shows that lift teams reduce employee injuries by 75 percent, aiding overall nurse retention and satisfaction. The urban hospital's pilot team of 12 full- and part-time nurses is on call 24/7, 365 days per year, expects to reduce employee injuries while lowering incidence rates for patient falls, skin tears, pressure ulcers and pneumonia. Success measured by: Team utilization rates; Staff education, awareness and satisfaction rates; Employee injury rates; and Safety rates for patient handling. References: 1. Buerhaus, Peter I., Staiger, Douglas O., Auerbach, David I. Four-Part Series on Aging RN Workforce. Nursing Economics, 2000. 2. Buerhaus, Staiger and Auerbach. Implications of an Aging RN Workforce. Journal of the American Medical Association. June 14, 2000. 3. Letvak, Susan. Retaining the Older Nurse. Journal of Nursing Administration. July/August 2002. 4. Nelson, A. State of the science in patient care ergonomics: Lessons learned and gaps in knowledge. Presented at the Third Annual Safe Patient Handling and Movement Conference. March 5, 2003, Clearwater Beach, FL. 1. Stubbs, D.A., Buckle, P.W., Hudson, M.P., Rivers, P.M., and Baty, D. (1986). Backing out: Nurse wastage associated with back pain. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 23, 4: 325-336. 2. Owen, B.D. (1989). The magnitude of low-back problems in nursing. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 11, 2: 234-242. 3. Owen, B.D. (2000). Preventing injuries using an ergonomic approach. AORN Journal, 72, 6: 1031-1036. 4. Trinkoff, A.M., Lipscomb, J.A., Geiger-Brown, J., Storr, C.L., Brady, B.A. (2003). Perceived physical demands and reported musculoskeletal problems in registered nurses. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 24, 3: 270-275.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies for Keeping Veteran Nurses at the Bedsideen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOstermeier, Lydiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorWolverton, Cherylen_US
dc.author.detailsLydia Ostermeier, RN, BSN, Clarian Health Partners, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, mail: losterme@clarian.org; Cheryl Wolverton, MSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182965-
dc.description.abstractPaper Presentation: The nation's aging workforce poses unique challenges for employers seeking to retain top-notch talent. As retirement-eligible employees continue working, companies are recruiting, retaining and developing benefits plans tailored for them in order to gain a competitive edge. With nursing shortages estimated at 800,000 by the year 2002, health care employers are finding creative ways to extend workforce longevity and retain veteran, expert nurses. An urban Midwest hospital system employing more than 4,000 nurses, devotes significant resources toward nurse recruitment and retention efforts is putting greater focus on veteran bedside nurses. A workforce for keeping RNs at the bedside is conducting focus groups and devising strategies to help improve "a typical day" for a bedside nurse. Issues addressed: Shift flexibility, Physical and mental demands of the work, Unit ergonomic improvements, Enhanced perks/ benefits, and Cultural beliefs and approaches to aging. A pilot RELAY Team (Responsive Ergonomic Lift Assistance for You) of specially-trained nurses provides scheduled and urgent assistance with patient repositioning, turning, transfer and lifting. Research shows that lift teams reduce employee injuries by 75 percent, aiding overall nurse retention and satisfaction. The urban hospital's pilot team of 12 full- and part-time nurses is on call 24/7, 365 days per year, expects to reduce employee injuries while lowering incidence rates for patient falls, skin tears, pressure ulcers and pneumonia. Success measured by: Team utilization rates; Staff education, awareness and satisfaction rates; Employee injury rates; and Safety rates for patient handling. References: 1. Buerhaus, Peter I., Staiger, Douglas O., Auerbach, David I. Four-Part Series on Aging RN Workforce. Nursing Economics, 2000. 2. Buerhaus, Staiger and Auerbach. Implications of an Aging RN Workforce. Journal of the American Medical Association. June 14, 2000. 3. Letvak, Susan. Retaining the Older Nurse. Journal of Nursing Administration. July/August 2002. 4. Nelson, A. State of the science in patient care ergonomics: Lessons learned and gaps in knowledge. Presented at the Third Annual Safe Patient Handling and Movement Conference. March 5, 2003, Clearwater Beach, FL. 1. Stubbs, D.A., Buckle, P.W., Hudson, M.P., Rivers, P.M., and Baty, D. (1986). Backing out: Nurse wastage associated with back pain. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 23, 4: 325-336. 2. Owen, B.D. (1989). The magnitude of low-back problems in nursing. Western Journal of Nursing Research, 11, 2: 234-242. 3. Owen, B.D. (2000). Preventing injuries using an ergonomic approach. AORN Journal, 72, 6: 1031-1036. 4. Trinkoff, A.M., Lipscomb, J.A., Geiger-Brown, J., Storr, C.L., Brady, B.A. (2003). Perceived physical demands and reported musculoskeletal problems in registered nurses. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 24, 3: 270-275.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:48:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:48:14Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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