2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182973
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
SBAR and the Problem of Nurse-Physician Phone Communication
Author(s):
Rodgers, Karen
Author Details:
Karen Rodgers, BSN CCRN, Humility of Mary Health Partners, St. Elizabeth Health Center, Youngstown, Ohio, USA, email: karen_rodgers@hmis.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: According to the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), communication errors are the root cause of almost 70% of sentinel events (JCAHO, 2005). In an attempt to improve the safety of patient care, JCAHO is espousing the use of a communication tool known as the Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation (SBAR) tool. However, a literature review reveals that very little is known about how to implement or evaluate the effectiveness of SBAR. Before precious healthcare resources are invested in the widespread implementation of SBAR, further research needs to be completed. This study will pilot a program to train registered nurses in the use of SBAR to facilitate nurse-physician phone communication. A convenience sample of registered nurses will receive training about the use of the SBAR tool to format nurse-physician telephone communication. The effectiveness of the SBAR training will be evaluated by administering pre- and post-training Likert-style attitude surveys, which have been designed to measure the nurses' anxiety levels and self-perceptions of the skill they demonstrate when calling physicians. The study's simple, quasi-experimental design, consisting of a treatment group without a control group, is intended to facilitate rapid data collection and subsequent evaluation of the training program. The results may then be used to make revisions in training, implementation, and survey tools before system-wide implementation and ultimately, more stringent research takes place. References: Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (2005). Root causes of sentinel events. Retrieved November 16, 2005, from http://www.jcaho.org/accredited+organizations/ambulatory+care/sentinel+events/root+causes+of+sentinel+event.htm.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSBAR and the Problem of Nurse-Physician Phone Communicationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRodgers, Karenen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Rodgers, BSN CCRN, Humility of Mary Health Partners, St. Elizabeth Health Center, Youngstown, Ohio, USA, email: karen_rodgers@hmis.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182973-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: According to the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), communication errors are the root cause of almost 70% of sentinel events (JCAHO, 2005). In an attempt to improve the safety of patient care, JCAHO is espousing the use of a communication tool known as the Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation (SBAR) tool. However, a literature review reveals that very little is known about how to implement or evaluate the effectiveness of SBAR. Before precious healthcare resources are invested in the widespread implementation of SBAR, further research needs to be completed. This study will pilot a program to train registered nurses in the use of SBAR to facilitate nurse-physician phone communication. A convenience sample of registered nurses will receive training about the use of the SBAR tool to format nurse-physician telephone communication. The effectiveness of the SBAR training will be evaluated by administering pre- and post-training Likert-style attitude surveys, which have been designed to measure the nurses' anxiety levels and self-perceptions of the skill they demonstrate when calling physicians. The study's simple, quasi-experimental design, consisting of a treatment group without a control group, is intended to facilitate rapid data collection and subsequent evaluation of the training program. The results may then be used to make revisions in training, implementation, and survey tools before system-wide implementation and ultimately, more stringent research takes place. References: Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (2005). Root causes of sentinel events. Retrieved November 16, 2005, from http://www.jcaho.org/accredited+organizations/ambulatory+care/sentinel+events/root+causes+of+sentinel+event.htm.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:48:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:48:36Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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