2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182974
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Early Extubation for CABG Patients Using Lean Six Sigma Methodology
Author(s):
Rowe-Peplinski, Lisa; Annis, Theresa
Author Details:
Lisa Rowe-Peplinski, RN, BSN, MSN, Saint Joseph's Hospital, Marshfield, Wisconsin, USA, email: RowePepL@stjosephs-marshfield.org; Theresa Annis, RN, BSN, MSN, CCNS
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: A multidisciplinary team comprised of representatives from Nursing, Administration, Performance Improvement, Anesthesiology, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Pharmacy, Respiratory Therapy, and Data Registries was chartered with the task of improving the existing extubation process in the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) population using the Lean Six Sigma methodology. The Lean Six Sigma methodology is a rigorous approach to reduce or eliminate the root cause of problems and non-value added steps in work process. Team goals were determined by evidence-based practice, standards of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the guiding principle that a positive impact on extubation times and costs, as well as, avoidance of complications would occur from changes in the process. The team flow charted the process as it existed, defined and flow charted the desired process, sought feedback from key stakeholders to design and implement the desired process, provided education about the new process then trialed and refined the new process. The outcomes of the process change included a reduction in average intubation time, an increase in the number of patients extubated within six hours of surgery and cost reduction in ventilator and respiratory therapy charges. In addition, the team monitored re-intubation and pneumonia rates with no increase in response to the process changes. Positive working relationships based on mutual respect among all disciplines reinforced and contributed to the success of this multidisciplinary team. Utilization of the Lean Six Sigma methodology proved to be very effective in accomplishing the goals. References: Lean Six Sigma.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEarly Extubation for CABG Patients Using Lean Six Sigma Methodologyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRowe-Peplinski, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnnis, Theresaen_US
dc.author.detailsLisa Rowe-Peplinski, RN, BSN, MSN, Saint Joseph's Hospital, Marshfield, Wisconsin, USA, email: RowePepL@stjosephs-marshfield.org; Theresa Annis, RN, BSN, MSN, CCNSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182974-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: A multidisciplinary team comprised of representatives from Nursing, Administration, Performance Improvement, Anesthesiology, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Pharmacy, Respiratory Therapy, and Data Registries was chartered with the task of improving the existing extubation process in the Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG) population using the Lean Six Sigma methodology. The Lean Six Sigma methodology is a rigorous approach to reduce or eliminate the root cause of problems and non-value added steps in work process. Team goals were determined by evidence-based practice, standards of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and the guiding principle that a positive impact on extubation times and costs, as well as, avoidance of complications would occur from changes in the process. The team flow charted the process as it existed, defined and flow charted the desired process, sought feedback from key stakeholders to design and implement the desired process, provided education about the new process then trialed and refined the new process. The outcomes of the process change included a reduction in average intubation time, an increase in the number of patients extubated within six hours of surgery and cost reduction in ventilator and respiratory therapy charges. In addition, the team monitored re-intubation and pneumonia rates with no increase in response to the process changes. Positive working relationships based on mutual respect among all disciplines reinforced and contributed to the success of this multidisciplinary team. Utilization of the Lean Six Sigma methodology proved to be very effective in accomplishing the goals. References: Lean Six Sigma.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:48:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:48:38Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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