2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182989
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caring From the Patient's Point of View
Author(s):
Takes, Kay; Mottet, Louann; Cherne, Amy
Author Details:
Kay Takes, RN, BSN, MA, CNAA, Mercy Medical Center - Dubuque & Dyersville, Dubuque, Iowa, USA, email: takesk@mercyhealth.com; Louann Mottet, RN, MSN, OCN; Amy Cherne, RN, BSN, MSN
Abstract:
Paper Presentation: Kristin Swanson's Middle Range Theory of Caring describes five caring processes: Maintaining Belief; Knowing; Being With; Doing For; and Enabling/Informing. Nurse leaders at this community hospital embraced Swanson's theory as the basis for creation of their Caring Model, which is conceptually represented at the center of their Nursing Professional Practice Model. Caring Model Phase I was foundational in nature and included the development of core expectations for caring behaviors, which have been incorporated into annual performance conversations with clinicians. Phase II resulted in a scripted process used by all nurses, which invites the patient into shift-to-shift and unit-to-unit reports to enhance transfers in care. In the Phase II work, the team focused on the essence of Swanson's Caring Principle: Knowing the Patient, or striving to understand an event as it has meaning in the life of the other. So that we could ensure that the patient's feedback and wishes were included in hand-offs in care, we created a standard question that is asked by all nurses in preparation for verbal and written reports. The information is then shared during report; and the loop is closed when the oncoming nurse acknowledges the patient's comments and requests at the beginning of the next shift of care. This initiative, while simple, is quite powerful in conveying to the patient and family that their needs and perspectives are central to our care. References: Dingman, S.K., Williams, M., Fassbinder, D., & Warnick, M. (1999). Implementing a Caring Model to Improve Patient Satisfaction. Journal of Nursing Administration, 29(12), 30-37. Dinnen, J. (2004). Advance Care Planning: Special Populations & Cultural Sensitivity. Presentation, February, 2004. Felgen, J.A. (2001). Passion in Practice: The Patient as CEO. Journal of Nursing Administration, 30(10), 453-456. Hader, R. (2003). What Else Can I Do For You? Nursing Management, 34(11): 4. Hays, M.M., (2003). The Phenomenal Shift Report. Journal for Nurses in Staff Development, 19(1), 25-33. Henry, J.D., & Henry, L.S. (2004). Caring from the Inside Out: Strategies to Enhance Nurse Retention and Patient Satisfaction. Nurse Leader, 2(1), 28-32. Mosher, C., Bontomasi, R., (1996). How to Improve Your Shift Report. American Journal of Nursing, 96(8), 32-34. Person, C. (2003). Relationship Based Care Delivery. Presentation, September 26, 2003. Mercy Medical Center Caring Model Team meeting. St. Joseph Mercy Health System, (2003). Relationship Centered/Outcomes-Based Care: Early Successes. Presentation, Trinity Health Fall Conference 2003. Swanson, K.M. (1991). Empirical development of a middle range theory of caring. Nursing Research, 40(3), 161-166. Swanson, K.M. (1993). Nursing as Informed Caring for the Well-Being of Others. IMAGE: Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 24(4), 352-357. Williams, S.A. (1997). The Relationship of Patients' Perceptions of Holistic Nurse Caring to Satisfaction with Nursing Care. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 11(5), 15-29.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaring From the Patient's Point of Viewen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTakes, Kayen_US
dc.contributor.authorMottet, Louannen_US
dc.contributor.authorCherne, Amyen_US
dc.author.detailsKay Takes, RN, BSN, MA, CNAA, Mercy Medical Center - Dubuque & Dyersville, Dubuque, Iowa, USA, email: takesk@mercyhealth.com; Louann Mottet, RN, MSN, OCN; Amy Cherne, RN, BSN, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182989-
dc.description.abstractPaper Presentation: Kristin Swanson's Middle Range Theory of Caring describes five caring processes: Maintaining Belief; Knowing; Being With; Doing For; and Enabling/Informing. Nurse leaders at this community hospital embraced Swanson's theory as the basis for creation of their Caring Model, which is conceptually represented at the center of their Nursing Professional Practice Model. Caring Model Phase I was foundational in nature and included the development of core expectations for caring behaviors, which have been incorporated into annual performance conversations with clinicians. Phase II resulted in a scripted process used by all nurses, which invites the patient into shift-to-shift and unit-to-unit reports to enhance transfers in care. In the Phase II work, the team focused on the essence of Swanson's Caring Principle: Knowing the Patient, or striving to understand an event as it has meaning in the life of the other. So that we could ensure that the patient's feedback and wishes were included in hand-offs in care, we created a standard question that is asked by all nurses in preparation for verbal and written reports. The information is then shared during report; and the loop is closed when the oncoming nurse acknowledges the patient's comments and requests at the beginning of the next shift of care. This initiative, while simple, is quite powerful in conveying to the patient and family that their needs and perspectives are central to our care. References: Dingman, S.K., Williams, M., Fassbinder, D., & Warnick, M. (1999). Implementing a Caring Model to Improve Patient Satisfaction. Journal of Nursing Administration, 29(12), 30-37. Dinnen, J. (2004). Advance Care Planning: Special Populations & Cultural Sensitivity. Presentation, February, 2004. Felgen, J.A. (2001). Passion in Practice: The Patient as CEO. Journal of Nursing Administration, 30(10), 453-456. Hader, R. (2003). What Else Can I Do For You? Nursing Management, 34(11): 4. Hays, M.M., (2003). The Phenomenal Shift Report. Journal for Nurses in Staff Development, 19(1), 25-33. Henry, J.D., & Henry, L.S. (2004). Caring from the Inside Out: Strategies to Enhance Nurse Retention and Patient Satisfaction. Nurse Leader, 2(1), 28-32. Mosher, C., Bontomasi, R., (1996). How to Improve Your Shift Report. American Journal of Nursing, 96(8), 32-34. Person, C. (2003). Relationship Based Care Delivery. Presentation, September 26, 2003. Mercy Medical Center Caring Model Team meeting. St. Joseph Mercy Health System, (2003). Relationship Centered/Outcomes-Based Care: Early Successes. Presentation, Trinity Health Fall Conference 2003. Swanson, K.M. (1991). Empirical development of a middle range theory of caring. Nursing Research, 40(3), 161-166. Swanson, K.M. (1993). Nursing as Informed Caring for the Well-Being of Others. IMAGE: Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 24(4), 352-357. Williams, S.A. (1997). The Relationship of Patients' Perceptions of Holistic Nurse Caring to Satisfaction with Nursing Care. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 11(5), 15-29.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:49:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:49:20Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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