2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182991
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Human Patient Simulation for Graduate Nurses
Author(s):
Todd, Frances
Author Details:
Frances Todd, MSN, RN, Dartmouth-Hitchcock medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA, email: fran.todd@hitchcock.org
Abstract:
Paper Presentation: A hospital residency program for recent graduate nurses integrating human patient simulation into an educational program is successful. The program relies on principles described in the constructivist theories of learning by John Dewey where learning is experientially based and the work of Hubert Dreyfus where learning goals and experience is central. The simulation experiences are modeled after the Anesthesia Crew Resource Management Model (ACRM) to promote acquisition of knowledge and teamwork. Purpose: The goals of the program are to ease the transition from student nurse to professional nurse, maintain consistently high standards of care, and attract and retain new nurses. Decreasing the cost of orientation is also a consideration. Evaluation Tools: Program effectiveness is measured weekly by self?reported levels of confidence, competence, and readiness to practice. Readiness for Entry into Practice (a measure of self-efficacy) is administered at predetermined intervals during the program. Nurse performance is evaluated by instructors using a Simulation Performance Evaluation tool. Results: Data from three cohorts (n=44) were analyzed using paired t-tests. Results demonstrated significant improvement (p < .001) from the beginning to the end of the program in residents' ratings of their self-efficacy, confidence, competency, and readiness to practice. Data analyzes from three additional cohorts (n=58) and instructor performance evaluation scores (n=102) are pending. Additionally, length of orientation is shorter and experiences are less variable. Resident's evaluations of simulated clinical scenarios found 96.5% of residents thought simulation should be part of a residency program and 98.7% found simulations and related content helpful.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Human Patient Simulation for Graduate Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTodd, Francesen_US
dc.author.detailsFrances Todd, MSN, RN, Dartmouth-Hitchcock medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA, email: fran.todd@hitchcock.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182991-
dc.description.abstractPaper Presentation: A hospital residency program for recent graduate nurses integrating human patient simulation into an educational program is successful. The program relies on principles described in the constructivist theories of learning by John Dewey where learning is experientially based and the work of Hubert Dreyfus where learning goals and experience is central. The simulation experiences are modeled after the Anesthesia Crew Resource Management Model (ACRM) to promote acquisition of knowledge and teamwork. Purpose: The goals of the program are to ease the transition from student nurse to professional nurse, maintain consistently high standards of care, and attract and retain new nurses. Decreasing the cost of orientation is also a consideration. Evaluation Tools: Program effectiveness is measured weekly by self?reported levels of confidence, competence, and readiness to practice. Readiness for Entry into Practice (a measure of self-efficacy) is administered at predetermined intervals during the program. Nurse performance is evaluated by instructors using a Simulation Performance Evaluation tool. Results: Data from three cohorts (n=44) were analyzed using paired t-tests. Results demonstrated significant improvement (p &lt; .001) from the beginning to the end of the program in residents' ratings of their self-efficacy, confidence, competency, and readiness to practice. Data analyzes from three additional cohorts (n=58) and instructor performance evaluation scores (n=102) are pending. Additionally, length of orientation is shorter and experiences are less variable. Resident's evaluations of simulated clinical scenarios found 96.5% of residents thought simulation should be part of a residency program and 98.7% found simulations and related content helpful.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:49:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:49:26Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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