2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182994
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Servant Nurse Leader: Achieving Quality Outcomes
Author(s):
White, Jody
Author Details:
Jody [Joseph] White, RN, BS, BSN, UAB/University Hospital, Heart Transplant Intensive Care Unit, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, email: jdwhite@uabmc.edu
Abstract:
Paper Presentation: Quality healthcare outcomes are increasingly becoming linked to leadership style. The way that nurses treat their patients is often a reflection of their leadership. In addition, nurses must be satisfied with their work environments and have meaningful outlets to articulate and express their unique collective roles and their individuality. With increased fulfillment positive employee satisfaction levels can be achieved which in turn have been found to correlate with positive patient and family satisfaction. One component behind these outcomes may be the servant nurse leader. The servant nurse leader challenges the traditional power based models of leadership. The servant leader serves from the heart as he guides the individual towards greater fulfillment of their role and individuality. The servant leader avoids a power based self-serving agenda by employing a unique set of characteristics to ascertain and nurture the follower's unique needs and aspirations. When this is done, a sense of community is restored by the servant leader that is needed to heal the deteriorating milieu that is often the result of large and bureaucratic healthcare systems. This deterioration as evidenced by the nursing shortage best underscores the need for leaders to change their outlooks and leadership style towards a more ecumenical and holistic approach. The servant leader approach may not only restore the trust of nurses in its leadership but it may also be a good approach to achieve quality clinical outcomes. The servant leader understands that nurses are at the bedside because of their natural instinct to serve and meet the needs of patients by providing an outstanding hospital experience. References: Campbell, P.T. & Rudisill, P.T. (2005). Servant Leadership: A Critical Component for Nurse Leaders. Nurse Leader, June 2005. Greenleaf, R. On Becoming a Servant Leader In: Frick, D, Spears, I, eds. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass; 1996 Howatson-Jones, I.L. (2004). The Servant Leader. Nursing Management, 11(3), 20 - 24. Porter-O-Grady, T. (2003). A Different Age for leadership: new context, new content. Journal of Nursing Administration, 33(2), 105 - 110. Swearingen, S., & Liberman, A.. (2004). Nursing Leadership Serving Those Who Serve Others. The Health Care Manager, 23(2), 100 - 109. Whetstone, J.T. (2002). Personalism and moral leadership: the servant leader with a transforming vision. Business Ethics: A European Review, 11(4), 385 - 392.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Servant Nurse Leader: Achieving Quality Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhite, Jodyen_US
dc.author.detailsJody [Joseph] White, RN, BS, BSN, UAB/University Hospital, Heart Transplant Intensive Care Unit, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, email: jdwhite@uabmc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182994-
dc.description.abstractPaper Presentation: Quality healthcare outcomes are increasingly becoming linked to leadership style. The way that nurses treat their patients is often a reflection of their leadership. In addition, nurses must be satisfied with their work environments and have meaningful outlets to articulate and express their unique collective roles and their individuality. With increased fulfillment positive employee satisfaction levels can be achieved which in turn have been found to correlate with positive patient and family satisfaction. One component behind these outcomes may be the servant nurse leader. The servant nurse leader challenges the traditional power based models of leadership. The servant leader serves from the heart as he guides the individual towards greater fulfillment of their role and individuality. The servant leader avoids a power based self-serving agenda by employing a unique set of characteristics to ascertain and nurture the follower's unique needs and aspirations. When this is done, a sense of community is restored by the servant leader that is needed to heal the deteriorating milieu that is often the result of large and bureaucratic healthcare systems. This deterioration as evidenced by the nursing shortage best underscores the need for leaders to change their outlooks and leadership style towards a more ecumenical and holistic approach. The servant leader approach may not only restore the trust of nurses in its leadership but it may also be a good approach to achieve quality clinical outcomes. The servant leader understands that nurses are at the bedside because of their natural instinct to serve and meet the needs of patients by providing an outstanding hospital experience. References: Campbell, P.T. & Rudisill, P.T. (2005). Servant Leadership: A Critical Component for Nurse Leaders. Nurse Leader, June 2005. Greenleaf, R. On Becoming a Servant Leader In: Frick, D, Spears, I, eds. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass; 1996 Howatson-Jones, I.L. (2004). The Servant Leader. Nursing Management, 11(3), 20 - 24. Porter-O-Grady, T. (2003). A Different Age for leadership: new context, new content. Journal of Nursing Administration, 33(2), 105 - 110. Swearingen, S., & Liberman, A.. (2004). Nursing Leadership Serving Those Who Serve Others. The Health Care Manager, 23(2), 100 - 109. Whetstone, J.T. (2002). Personalism and moral leadership: the servant leader with a transforming vision. Business Ethics: A European Review, 11(4), 385 - 392.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:49:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:49:34Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.