2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/182997
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Intravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA): Interdisciplinary Collaboration for Patient Safety
Author(s):
Willner, Heather; Lutz, Peggy
Author Details:
Heather Willner, RN, BSN, Saint Joseph's Hospital/ MHC, Marshfield, Wisconsin, USA, email: WillnerH@stjosephs-marshfield.org; Peggy Lutz, RN
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: A significant number of patients receive self-administered intravenous opioids to manage their pain. PCA is a safe and effective way to manage pain when guidelines for use are established. An interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, and pharmacists collaborated to identify best practice standards to improve patient safety with PCA. The project began in November 2004 with a goal of identifying patients at risk for opioid induced sedation and respiratory depression. Quickly, the team realized that PCA safety is a multifaceted project. The Pain Resource Team met bi-weekly with medical staff to review the literature and write the protocols. The project concluded in November 2005, resulting in standardized dosing parameters for adults with and without risk factors, implementation of family controlled analgesia guidelines, clinical guidelines distributed to medical staff, and revision to the PCA policy to minimize the risk of pump programming errors. Beyond the clinical experts, members from the Nursing Practice Council, Pain Resource Nurses, Quality Council, Safety Committee, and senior leadership facilitated implementation of this project. Significant time was invested in communicating the changes to staff. Written materials summarizing changes were distributed to nursing staff, in-services were conducted for pharmacy staff, and medical staff department meetings were attended in order to facilitate a smooth transition to the new policies and orders. The interdisciplinary team continues to collect data to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of IV PCA, as well as compliance with the required screening process on the PCA orders.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Description:
10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntravenous Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA): Interdisciplinary Collaboration for Patient Safetyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWillner, Heatheren_US
dc.contributor.authorLutz, Peggyen_US
dc.author.detailsHeather Willner, RN, BSN, Saint Joseph's Hospital/ MHC, Marshfield, Wisconsin, USA, email: WillnerH@stjosephs-marshfield.org; Peggy Lutz, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/182997-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: A significant number of patients receive self-administered intravenous opioids to manage their pain. PCA is a safe and effective way to manage pain when guidelines for use are established. An interdisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, and pharmacists collaborated to identify best practice standards to improve patient safety with PCA. The project began in November 2004 with a goal of identifying patients at risk for opioid induced sedation and respiratory depression. Quickly, the team realized that PCA safety is a multifaceted project. The Pain Resource Team met bi-weekly with medical staff to review the literature and write the protocols. The project concluded in November 2005, resulting in standardized dosing parameters for adults with and without risk factors, implementation of family controlled analgesia guidelines, clinical guidelines distributed to medical staff, and revision to the PCA policy to minimize the risk of pump programming errors. Beyond the clinical experts, members from the Nursing Practice Council, Pain Resource Nurses, Quality Council, Safety Committee, and senior leadership facilitated implementation of this project. Significant time was invested in communicating the changes to staff. Written materials summarizing changes were distributed to nursing staff, in-services were conducted for pharmacy staff, and medical staff department meetings were attended in order to facilitate a smooth transition to the new policies and orders. The interdisciplinary team continues to collect data to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of IV PCA, as well as compliance with the required screening process on the PCA orders.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:49:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:49:42Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description10th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 4-6 October, 2006 at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, Colorado, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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