2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183002
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Patient Outcomes through Barcode Scanning To Reduce Medication Errors
Author(s):
Anderson, Carliss
Author Details:
Carliss Anderson, RN, MSN, Flagler Hospital, Inc., St. Augustine, Florida, USA, email: carliss.anderson@flaglerhospital.org
Abstract:
Poster Presentation: Patient safety, in particular, medication error prevention, has become a major issue for healthcare providers, payers, and patients. The prevalence of medication errors has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. The push toward paperless medicine seems inevitable. One in five American families, (8.1 million households) experiences a serious drug error, 33% during hospitalization. Seven thousand Americans die annually from Medication Errors! ICU patients suffer more life-threatening medication errors than any other patient population and Pediatric patients experience harmful medication errors 3 times more often than adults. In the mid 1990's, hospitals begin to recognize the value of taking bar code technology to the bedside for medication administration, The new clinical applications are known as barcode-enabled point-of-care (BPOE) systems. This is the main technology choice for healthcare organizations in preventing medication errors. This technology is designed to detect errors at the bedside at the point of administration. Thirty-eight percent of errors occur during medication administration. The (BPOC) system works as a system of checks and balances to intervene before a nurse inadvertently violates any or all of the "5 rights" of medication administration. Congruent with our mission statement "The best patient experience with the best staff", appropriate resource, both financial and human, are allocated to continue improving patient outcomes through an improved patient safety environment. References: Pape, T. (2001). Searching for the final answer: Factors contributing to medication administration errors. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing: 32(4), 152-160 (Institute of Medicine (IOM) 1999). (Agency for Health Care Research & Quality (AHRQ) 2001 JAMA 2001)
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
ANCC National Magnet Conference
Conference Host:
American Nurses Credentialing Center
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Patient Outcomes through Barcode Scanning To Reduce Medication Errorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Carlissen_US
dc.author.detailsCarliss Anderson, RN, MSN, Flagler Hospital, Inc., St. Augustine, Florida, USA, email: carliss.anderson@flaglerhospital.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183002-
dc.description.abstractPoster Presentation: Patient safety, in particular, medication error prevention, has become a major issue for healthcare providers, payers, and patients. The prevalence of medication errors has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. The push toward paperless medicine seems inevitable. One in five American families, (8.1 million households) experiences a serious drug error, 33% during hospitalization. Seven thousand Americans die annually from Medication Errors! ICU patients suffer more life-threatening medication errors than any other patient population and Pediatric patients experience harmful medication errors 3 times more often than adults. In the mid 1990's, hospitals begin to recognize the value of taking bar code technology to the bedside for medication administration, The new clinical applications are known as barcode-enabled point-of-care (BPOE) systems. This is the main technology choice for healthcare organizations in preventing medication errors. This technology is designed to detect errors at the bedside at the point of administration. Thirty-eight percent of errors occur during medication administration. The (BPOC) system works as a system of checks and balances to intervene before a nurse inadvertently violates any or all of the "5 rights" of medication administration. Congruent with our mission statement "The best patient experience with the best staff", appropriate resource, both financial and human, are allocated to continue improving patient outcomes through an improved patient safety environment. References: Pape, T. (2001). Searching for the final answer: Factors contributing to medication administration errors. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing: 32(4), 152-160 (Institute of Medicine (IOM) 1999). (Agency for Health Care Research & Quality (AHRQ) 2001 JAMA 2001)en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T15:49:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T15:49:56Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameANCC National Magnet Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostAmerican Nurses Credentialing Centeren_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.description"Connect, Empower and Celebrate" was the theme of the 11th American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) National Magnet Conference, held 3-5 October, 2007 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.