2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183032
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevention of CT Extravasation
Author(s):
Slack, Tamara
Author Details:
Tamara Slack, RN, BSN, Munroe Regional Medical Center, Ocala, FL, email: TamaraSlack@mrhs.org
Abstract:
Purpose: Increasing incidence of extravasation in CT lead to a descriptive study to decrease the number of patients having problems and identifying risk factors that could contribute to extravasation. Method: We identified the acceptable American College of Radiology ranges , defined the difference between infiltrates and extravasation, risk factors that contribute, and also changed CT protocols. Findings: Based on literature review the American College of Radiology acceptable range is from 0.1% - 0.9%. Extravasation is the inadvertent administration of a vesicant solution into surrounding tissue. Risk factors that we could not change were patients who cannot communicate adequately (elderly, infants, or patients with altered consciousness), debilitation, or patients with poor circulation. Things we could change included using low-osmolar contrast which is better than high-osmolar, changing the size of IV catheter, limiting the site of injection, and use of a mechanical power injector. We changed our protocols in CT to include: checking all IV sites by flushing with saline first while visualizing and palpating the access site. Other changes included using a 20 gauge or larger catheter, locating sites medially or in an antecubital vein, using a 60 inch coiled low pressure tube which reduces motion effect, flushing with power injector, and using no field IV sites. Discussion: CT changed their policy on checking IV sites and infusion processes. We reduced our IV extravasation rate to 0.3% from 0.5% which is within the guidelines recommended by the American College of Radiology. Our ultimate goal is 0.1 %.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevention of CT Extravasationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSlack, Tamaraen_US
dc.author.detailsTamara Slack, RN, BSN, Munroe Regional Medical Center, Ocala, FL, email: TamaraSlack@mrhs.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183032-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Increasing incidence of extravasation in CT lead to a descriptive study to decrease the number of patients having problems and identifying risk factors that could contribute to extravasation. Method: We identified the acceptable American College of Radiology ranges , defined the difference between infiltrates and extravasation, risk factors that contribute, and also changed CT protocols. Findings: Based on literature review the American College of Radiology acceptable range is from 0.1% - 0.9%. Extravasation is the inadvertent administration of a vesicant solution into surrounding tissue. Risk factors that we could not change were patients who cannot communicate adequately (elderly, infants, or patients with altered consciousness), debilitation, or patients with poor circulation. Things we could change included using low-osmolar contrast which is better than high-osmolar, changing the size of IV catheter, limiting the site of injection, and use of a mechanical power injector. We changed our protocols in CT to include: checking all IV sites by flushing with saline first while visualizing and palpating the access site. Other changes included using a 20 gauge or larger catheter, locating sites medially or in an antecubital vein, using a 60 inch coiled low pressure tube which reduces motion effect, flushing with power injector, and using no field IV sites. Discussion: CT changed their policy on checking IV sites and infusion processes. We reduced our IV extravasation rate to 0.3% from 0.5% which is within the guidelines recommended by the American College of Radiology. Our ultimate goal is 0.1 %.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:11:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:11:39Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.