2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/183065
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Restrained in the Intensive Care Unit: Looking through the Lens of Patients' Eyes
Author(s):
Dodd, Sandra; Crouch, S.
Author Details:
Sandra Dodd, MSN, CCRN, Martin Memorial Health Systems, Stuart, FL, email: sdodd@mmhs-fla.org; S. Crouch
Abstract:
Although the use of physical restraints is a standard of practice, use of physical restraints has been shown to cause psychological, physical, legal and ethical problems (Mott, Poole, & Kenrick, 2005). While there is significant published work on restraints in regards to safety issues, ethical concerns, and family involvement, there is little nursing research published on patients' perceptions of the physical restraint experience (Happ, Tuite, Dobbin, DiVirgilio-Thomas, & Kitutu, 2004). While on a ventilator, patients often lose their "voice" to express their emotional or physical concerns. During this period, the nurse must act as the patient's advocate and speak with the patient's voice (Gadow, 1998). Current nursing research in the study of physical restraints becomes increasingly important when one considers trends in using minimal sedation in caring for ventilator patients. The purpose of this nursing research was to view restraint experiences through the lens of patients' eyes and listen to their voices regarding their experiences. The setting for this study was four intensive care units at two medical centers in southeastern Florida. A total of fifty (50) patients participated in this nursing research study. Participants consisted of a convenience sample of patients who were admitted to one of the four intensive care units. After removal from both the ventilator and physical restraints, patients were contacted by the nurse researchers for the purpose of conducting interviews regarding their restraint experiences.
The questions for tape recorded semi-structured interviews were as follows: "Tell me about your restraint experience while on ventilator care in the intensive care unit." "What was most important to you during your restraint experience?" "Describe how physical restraints impacted your patient care experience." "Is there anything you believe may be important for us to know about your restraint experience while on ventilator care in the intensive care unit?" Qualitative analysis reflected recurring themes centering on the emotions of vulnerability and anxiety related to loss of control. "I believed I was drowning from reflex." "Frightened, I was unable to complete my prayer with making the sign of the cross." "In pain, I pointed to the mouthpiece and was informed that it was correctly placed. Regardless, the result was a bruised windpipe, and the inability to eat solid food for three days." "It is very frustrating when nurses and staff get mad at you because they don't understand what you're trying to say or what you're pointing at." Information gathered may shed light on the patients' perceptions of the restraint experience and aid in hearing patients' voices. Implications for nursing practice may include an improvement in patient autonomy and an enhancement in overall quality of care and patient satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
28-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
28-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference
Conference Host:
University of South Florida College of Nursing; Sigma Theta Tau International; Florida Organization of Nurse Executives
Conference Location:
Naples, Florida, USA
Description:
7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRestrained in the Intensive Care Unit: Looking through the Lens of Patients' Eyesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Sandraen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrouch, S.en_US
dc.author.detailsSandra Dodd, MSN, CCRN, Martin Memorial Health Systems, Stuart, FL, email: sdodd@mmhs-fla.org; S. Crouchen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/183065-
dc.description.abstractAlthough the use of physical restraints is a standard of practice, use of physical restraints has been shown to cause psychological, physical, legal and ethical problems (Mott, Poole, &amp; Kenrick, 2005). While there is significant published work on restraints in regards to safety issues, ethical concerns, and family involvement, there is little nursing research published on patients' perceptions of the physical restraint experience (Happ, Tuite, Dobbin, DiVirgilio-Thomas, &amp; Kitutu, 2004). While on a ventilator, patients often lose their &quot;voice&quot; to express their emotional or physical concerns. During this period, the nurse must act as the patient's advocate and speak with the patient's voice (Gadow, 1998). Current nursing research in the study of physical restraints becomes increasingly important when one considers trends in using minimal sedation in caring for ventilator patients. The purpose of this nursing research was to view restraint experiences through the lens of patients' eyes and listen to their voices regarding their experiences. The setting for this study was four intensive care units at two medical centers in southeastern Florida. A total of fifty (50) patients participated in this nursing research study. Participants consisted of a convenience sample of patients who were admitted to one of the four intensive care units. After removal from both the ventilator and physical restraints, patients were contacted by the nurse researchers for the purpose of conducting interviews regarding their restraint experiences.<br/>The questions for tape recorded semi-structured interviews were as follows: &quot;Tell me about your restraint experience while on ventilator care in the intensive care unit.&quot; &quot;What was most important to you during your restraint experience?&quot; &quot;Describe how physical restraints impacted your patient care experience.&quot; &quot;Is there anything you believe may be important for us to know about your restraint experience while on ventilator care in the intensive care unit?&quot; Qualitative analysis reflected recurring themes centering on the emotions of vulnerability and anxiety related to loss of control. &quot;I believed I was drowning from reflex.&quot; &quot;Frightened, I was unable to complete my prayer with making the sign of the cross.&quot; &quot;In pain, I pointed to the mouthpiece and was informed that it was correctly placed. Regardless, the result was a bruised windpipe, and the inability to eat solid food for three days.&quot; &quot;It is very frustrating when nurses and staff get mad at you because they don't understand what you're trying to say or what you're pointing at.&quot; Information gathered may shed light on the patients' perceptions of the restraint experience and aid in hearing patients' voices. Implications for nursing practice may include an improvement in patient autonomy and an enhancement in overall quality of care and patient satisfaction.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-28T16:13:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-28en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-28T16:13:04Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.name7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conferenceen_US
dc.conference.hostUniversity of South Florida College of Nursingen_US
dc.conference.hostSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_US
dc.conference.hostFlorida Organization of Nurse Executivesen_US
dc.conference.locationNaples, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description7th Annual Florida Magnet Research Conference - Theme: Research at the Point of Care. Held 11-13 February 2010 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort, Naples, Florida, USA.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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